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WJCC 06: Draw day at the top tables

by Priyadarshan Banjan - 14/08/2016

The competition saw a dour day at the top tables as most of the games ended in draws. The top seed and the leader — Artemiev with white and Karthikeyan with black—drew their game. With 5.0/6, GM Murali Karthikeyan of Tamil Nadu continues to lead the tournament. A bunch of players is pursuing the leader Karthikeyan at the second spot with 4.5/6.

 

WJCC 06: Draw day at the top tables

The competition saw a dour day at the top tables as most of the games ended in draws.

The top seed and the leader — Artemiev with white and Karthikeyan with black— played an excellent game in the King's Indian Defence opening that ended in with Black taking a perpetual.

With 5.0/6, GM Murali Karthikeyan of Tamil Nadu continues to lead the tournament.

[Event "World Junior Chess Championship 2016"]
[Site "Bhubaneswar"]
[Date "2016.08.13"]
[Round "6.1"]
[White "Artemiev, Vladislav"]
[Black "Karthikeyan, Murali"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "E93"]
[WhiteElo "2665"]
[BlackElo "2514"]
[PlyCount "61"]
[EventDate "2016.08.13"]
[EventType "swiss"]
[EventRounds "13"]
[EventCountry "IND"]
[SourceDate "2003.06.08"]
[TimeControl "6000+1185"]
[WhiteClock "0:06:36"]
[BlackClock "0:05:27"]
1. Nf3 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. d4 O-O 6. Be2 e5 7. d5 Nbd7 8. Be3
a5 9. Nd2 Nc5 10. g4 c6 11. h4 Bd7 12. g5 Ne8 13. h5 Nc7 14. Nb3 cxd5 15. cxd5
Na4 16. Nxa4 Bxa4 17. Bb6 Qe7 18. Qd2 Nb5 19. h6 Bh8 20. Bxb5 Bxb5 21. Nxa5 Ra6
22. Be3 f5 23. gxf6 Qxf6 24. Rh3 Bd7 25. Bg5 Qf7 26. Ra3 Rxa5 27. Rxa5 Qf3 28.
Qe2 Qh1+ 29. Qf1 Qxe4+ 30. Qe2 Qh1+ 31. Qf1 1/2-1/2

 

The game on the second table between USA's GM Jeffrey Xiong and China's Xu Yinglun was also a draw. 

Polish IM Grzegorz Nasuta and Iran's IM Masoud Mosadeghpour held Indian grandmasters Aravindh Chithambaram and S.L. Narayanan respectively.

S.L. Narayanan (2515)
[Event "World Junior Chess Championship 2016"]
[Site "Bhubaneswar"]
[Date "2016.08.13"]
[Round "6.4"]
[White "Mosadeghpour, Masoud"]
[Black "Sunilduth Lyna, Narayanan"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "B90"]
[WhiteElo "2437"]
[BlackElo "2515"]
[PlyCount "74"]
[EventDate "2016.08.13"]
[EventType "swiss"]
[EventRounds "13"]
[EventCountry "IND"]
[SourceDate "2003.06.08"]
1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. f3 e5 7. Nb3 Be6 8. Be3
Nbd7 9. Qd2 b5 10. a4 b4 11. Nd5 Bxd5 12. exd5 Nb6 13. Bxb6 Qxb6 14. a5 Qb7 15.
Ra4 Rb8 16. Bc4 g6 17. Nc1 h5 18. Nd3 Bh6 19. Qxb4 Qc7 20. Qc3 Nxd5 21. Bxd5
Qxc3+ 22. bxc3 Rb1+ 23. Kf2 Rxh1 24. Rc4 Kd7 25. Bxf7 Ra1 26. Bxg6 Rxa5 27.
Bf5+ Ke7 28. Rc7+ Kf6 29. Be4 d5 30. Rc6+ Ke7 31. Bf5 Rf8 32. Re6+ Kd8 33. Rd6+
Ke7 34. Re6+ Kd8 35. Rd6+ Kc7 36. Rd7+ Kb8 37. Be6 Rf6 1/2-1/2

 

The fifth table saw a spectacular game by the third-seeded Russian GM Kirill Alekseenko. This allowed the Russian to join the hunt for the top places.

Thus, bunch of players is pursuing the leader Karthikeyan at the second spot with 4.5/6.

It looks like Black is in trouble, but Alekseenko had everything under control! What is the only idea to save and even win the game?
[Event "World Junior Chess Championship 2016"]
[Site "Bhubaneswar"]
[Date "2016.08.13"]
[Round "6.5"]
[White "Tran, Tuan Minh"]
[Black "Alekseenko, Kirill"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "D80"]
[WhiteElo "2473"]
[BlackElo "2582"]
[PlyCount "67"]
[EventDate "2016.08.13"]
[EventType "swiss"]
[EventRounds "13"]
[EventCountry "IND"]
[SourceDate "2003.06.08"]
[TimeControl "6000+1860"]
[WhiteClock "0:01:17"]
[BlackClock "0:07:13"]
1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. Bg5 Ne4 5. Bh4 Nxc3 6. bxc3 dxc4 7. e3 Be6 8.
Be2 Bg7 9. Nh3 Bxh3 10. gxh3 Qd7 11. Bg3 Nc6 12. Bxc4 Qxh3 13. Qf3 O-O 14. Bd5
Nd8 15. Qg2 Qc8 16. h4 c6 17. Bb3 h5 18. Qe4 e6 19. Rg1 c5 20. Ke2 cxd4 21.
cxd4 Qd7 22. Rac1 Nc6 23. Rc5 Rfe8 24. Bf4 Rac8 25. Rxh5 f5 26. Qf3 gxh5 27.
Bh6 Ne5 28. dxe5 Qb5+ 29. Ke1 Rc1+ 30. Bd1 Rd8 31. Rxg7+ Kh8 32. Rg8+ Rxg8 33.
Bg5 Qb4+ 34. Kf1 0-1

 

Standings after Round 06:

Rank   Name IRtg Club Type Pts Res. BH. BH. BL Vict
1 GM Karthikeyan Murali 2514 IND U18 5 0 20 23 3 4
2 GM Artemiev Vladislav 2665 RUS U18 0 21½ 24½ 2 3
3 GM Sunilduth Lyna Narayanan 2515 IND U18 0 21 24 3 3
4 GM Xiong Jeffery 2633 USA U16 0 20½ 24 3 3
5 IM Mosadeghpour Masoud 2437 IRI U20 0 19½ 22½ 3 3
6 GM Alekseenko Kirill 2582 RUS U20 0 19 22 3 4
  IM Svane Rasmus 2546 GER U20 0 19 22 3 4
8 GM Aravindh Chithambaram Vr. 2543 IND U18 0 19 22 3 3
9   Xu Yinglun 2516 CHN U20 0 17 19 3 3
10 IM Nasuta Grzegorz 2442 POL U20 0 16 18½ 3 3

 

Complete Standings


 

In the girls' section, the top two tables witnessed draws as well.

WGM Dinara Saduakassova settled for a draw with her namesake WIM Dinara Dordzhieva of Russia.

WIM Frayna Janelle Mae drew with Indian WIM Pv Nandhidhaa.

The biggest shock occurred on the third board, where the leader of the Indian challenge WIM Bodda Pratyusha blundered towards the end and lost to Tamil Nadu's Priyanka K., who caused her second straight upset.

 

This surprise win allowed her to join Dordzhieva and Frayna in the lead with 5.0/6.

Standings after Round 06:

Rank   Name   IRtg Club Type Pts Res. BH. BH. BL Vict
1 WIM Frayna Janelle Mae F 2292 PHI U20 5 0 21 24 3 4
2 WIM Dordzhieva Dinara F 2304 RUS U18 5 0 21 23½ 3 4
3   Priyanka K F 2048 IND U16 5 0 18 20½ 3 5
4 WIM Nandhidhaa Pv F 2151 IND U20 0 22 24 3 3
5 WIM Bivol Alina F 2362 RUS U20 0 19½ 22 3 4
6 WGM Saduakassova Dinara F 2423 KAZ U20 0 19½ 21½ 3 3
7 IM Rodriguez Rueda Paula Andrea F 2321 COL U20 0 18½ 20½ 3 4

Complete Standings


 

Impressions:

Iran's talented Aryan Gholami (2461) is on 3.5/5

Iran's strongest player by rating Parham Maghsoodloo (2576) is on 4.0/6

Two of the sharpest boys I have ever had the fortune to come across — Praggnanandhaa R. (Pragg--na--nan--dhaa) and Nihal Sarin. Behold, the future! Watch them LIVE here.

Pairings for Round 07:

Open

Girls

Games in PGN