chessbase india logo

Sant Martí 2016: Shyam Sundar triumphs!

by Atul Dahale - 28/07/2016

One of the better events in the Catalan circuit is the Sant Martí International tournament taking place in Barcelona, Spain. The average rating of the tourney was around 2200 Elo, including 12 GMs and 18 IMs. With a total of 140 players, 73 of them titled, the tournament was quite good for players searching for experience and ratings. GM Shyam Sunder lifted the trophy with 8.0/9 points. Atul Dahale has a detailed report with tons of analysis.

Sant Martí 2016: Shyam Sundar triumphs!  

One of the better events in the Catalan circuit is the Sant Martí International tournament taking place in Barcelona, Spain. The average rating of the tourney was around 2200 Elo, including 12 GMs and 18 IMs. With a total of 140 players, 73 of them titled, the tournament was quite good for players searching for experience and ratings. Indian GM Shyam Sundar had a dream tournament scoring 8.0/9 points to become the champion. The top seed was Axel Bachmann of Paraguay.

 

GM Shyam Sundar took sole lead after six rounds scoring 5.5 points and never looked back. On his road to victory, he won important games against Argentine GM Peralta Fernando (2588) and GM Murali Karthikeyan.

Shyam Sundar with Champion’s trophy! He was richer by 1200 euros.

In this tournament, Shyam had a magical performance with the black pieces as he won five games with the colour. Mainly, he played the Sicilian and King’s Indian Defense systems which show that he loves playing aggressive chess. He has annotated his crucial last round win against IM Kevel Oliva Castaneda of Cuba which secured him his first championship on the Catalan soil.

[Event "Sant Marti International Open 2016"] [Site "?"] [Date "2016.07.23"] [Round "9.1"] [White "Oliva Castaneda, Kevel"] [Black "M.Shyamsundar"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "E60"] [WhiteElo "2490"] [BlackElo "2526"] [PlyCount "62"] [EventDate "2016.??.??"] [SourceDate "2003.06.08"] {This was the last game of the event and I was leading along with my opponent. I was in the mood to play aggressive and fighting chess} 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 {I wanted to play King's Indian defense today as it suited my mood} 4. e4 O-O 5. Nf3 d6 6. Be2 e5 7. O-O Na6 {I thought of deviating from the main lines for this game} (7... Nc6 {is the main line.}) 8. Be3 Ng4 9. Bg5 Qe8 10. h3 h6 11. Bh4 (11. hxg4 hxg5 12. dxe5 dxe5 13. Nxg5 Qe7 14. Nh3 (14. Nf3 Bxg4 $15) 14... c6 $15 {with play on dark squares}) (11. Bc1 Nf6) 11... Nf6 12. dxe5 (12. Bxf6 Bxf6 13. c5 {is an interesting alternative}) 12... dxe5 13. Nd5 $6 { Probably my opponent had missed my next move} Nxe4 14. Be7 c6 15. Bxf8 Qxf8 $15 {During the game I felt that Black is already better here as his pieces lack proper squares and my dark squared B will become even more powerful once I manage to push my pawn to e4} 16. Ne3 f5 17. Nd2 (17. Qc2 Nec5 $17) (17. a3 Nec5 18. b4 e4 19. Ne1 Ne6 $15) 17... Ng5 {I decided to move my knight to g5 so that I can push my pawns to e4 and f4 and later possible sacrifices on h3} ( 17... Nxd2 {This capture was very tempting to me} 18. Qxd2 f4 19. Nc2 e4 { with active piece play.However I felt that White's position has improved and so I decided to go against this variation}) (17... Nec5 {is an interesting alternative}) 18. h4 {I was surprised when he had played this move.However its hard to suggest a playable alternative} Ne6 19. h5 (19. c5 {During the game,I thought that white goto sacrifice a pawn in order to create some practical chances} Naxc5 20. b4 Nd7 $15 {Black is still better.However he could have posed practical problems}) 19... gxh5 (19... f4 20. Ng4 gxh5 21. Nh2 {Though Black is better,I wasnt happy with this position}) (19... e4 20. hxg6 Qf6 $15) 20. Bxh5 (20. c5 {It was never too late to sacrifice the pawn and play for piece activity}) 20... e4 $17 (20... Nf4 21. g3 $13) 21. g4 {I was surprised when he played this move.I felt that this move cannot be right as most of my pieces are pointing towards his kingside and sank into deep thought} (21. Rb1 Nac5 $36) 21... Nf4 (21... f4 22. Nxe4 $1 (22. Nf5 Ng5 23. Nxg7 Qxg7 $15) 22... fxe3 23. fxe3 Qe7 (23... Qd8 24. Rf7 $16) 24. Rf7 (24. Qf3 Ng5 25. Nxg5 Qxg5 $15) 24... Qxf7 25. Bxf7+ Kxf7 {Though I have 3 pieces for a queen,my pieces are not co-ordinated} 26. Qf3+ Kg8 27. Rf1 $18) (21... Ng5 22. gxf5) 22. gxf5 ( 22. Nxf5 Nxh5 $19) 22... Bxf5 23. Bg4 (23. Nxf5 Qxf5 24. Qg4 (24. Bg4 Qg6 25. Kh2 Rd8 $19) 24... Qxh5 25. Qxh5 (25. Qxf4 Be5 {I had this position in my mind when I was calculating my 21st move and made sure that I am winning by force here} 26. Nxe4 Qg6+ $19 {The key move.Otherwise white survives} (26... Kh8 27. Ng3 $1 $18)) 25... Nxh5 26. Nxe4 Nf4 $17) 23... Bg6 $19 24. Qb3 Nc5 {Bringing my other N to the game as they can be very tricky in such tactical positions} 25. Qa3 h5 {kicking the B from the important g4 square that controls both e2 and h3 squares} 26. Bd1 Be5 27. Ng2 Nxg2 28. Kxg2 Rd8 {Bringing my last inactive piece to the game} 29. Nb3 (29. Qh3 Rxd2 30. Bxh5 Nd3 $19) 29... Qf4 ( 29... Rxd1 30. Nxc5 Rd3 $1 $19 31. Nxd3 Qf3+ 32. Kg1 Qg4+ 33. Kh1 Qh3+ 34. Kg1 Qh2#) 30. Rg1 Nd3 31. Qxa7 c5 0-1

Grandmaster Axel Bachmann (2649)

Axel Bachmann of Paraguay was the top seed of this tournament. He started slowly by making a couple of draws but finished strongly with important victories in the last three, rounds scoring 7.5/9 points.

 

In penultimate round, GM Axel Bachmann was paired against the second seed GM Fernando Peralta (2588), and they played quite an interesting game. Peralta showed some creativity and sacrificed an exchange for getting the initiative in the opening and after some adventure, they landed here:

Black to play
[Event "XVIII Obert Internacional Sant Martí 20"] [Site "Barcelona. Carrer Selva de Ma"] [Date "2016.07.20"] [Round "8.3"] [White "Peralta, Fernando"] [Black "Bachmann, Axel"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "A00"] [WhiteElo "2588"] [BlackElo "2649"] [SetUp "1"] [FEN "2rr2k1/1b5p/pP2ppp1/2B1N2q/2PP4/4Q3/5PPP/4R1K1 w - - 0 27"] [PlyCount "10"] [EventDate "2016.07.13"] [EventRounds "9"] [EventCountry "ESP"] [SourceDate "2003.06.08"] 27. Nf7 $1 {Brilliant move!} Kxf7 28. Qxe6+ Kg7 29. Qe7+ Kh6 {Upto this it's quite forced but now White made a mistake by capturing Bishop on b7, probably he missed black's 31st move.} 30. Qxb7 $2 ({It was necessary to play this move, first bringing back our bishop and then go for Q*b7 capturing the bishop.} 30. d5 $1 Qf5 ({If black tries to save bishop then he ends up in mating net!} 30... Rb8 31. Be3+ g5 32. Qxf6+ Qg6 33. Bxg5+ Kh5 34. g4+ Kxg4 35. Qf4+ Kh5 36. Qh4#) 31. Be3+ g5 32. Qxb7 Rxc4 {with the baby queen on b6 white has good chances!} 33. h4 Rxh4 34. Qe7 Rd7 (34... Rb8 35. Qc7 Rc8 36. Qd6 a5 37. b7 Rh8 38. b8=Q Rxb8 39. Qxb8 Qxd5) 35. Qf8+ Kg6 36. Qe8+ Kh6 37. Bc5 $18) {But it was a lucky day for Axel Bachmann. Did you find the move what he played?} 30... Rxc5 $1 31. dxc5 {It seems that white is having a great position, his pawns are ready to roll but Black struck with typical queen sacrifice!!} Qe2 $3 {Bolt from the blue!! Exploiting the backrank weakness! White resigned!} 0-1

IM Kevel Oliva Castaneda (2493) of Cuba had a dream run, securing the third position and a GM norm .

He has annotated his eighth round game which earned him the norm. It was an interesting and complex game:

[Event "Sant Marti Int Open 2016"] [Site "?"] [Date "2016.07.20"] [Round "8"] [White "Oliva Castaneda, Kevel"] [Black "Basallo Barroche, Mauricio"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "E94"] [WhiteElo "2493"] [BlackElo "2389"] [PlyCount "83"] [EventDate "2016.??.??"] [SourceDate "2003.06.08"] {In round 8, this was the game that secured my GM norm no matter what happens in the last round:} 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. Nf3 O-O 6. Be2 e5 7. O-O c6 8. d5 Na6 9. Be3 c5 10. Ne1 Ne8 11. Nd3 b6 $6 ({More natural is} 11... f5 12. exf5 (12. f4 $6 exf4 13. Nxf4 (13. Rxf4 Qe7 14. Qd2 Nf6 15. exf5 Bxf5 $36) 13... Qe7 14. Nd3 Nf6 15. e5 dxe5 16. Nxc5 Nxc5 17. d6 Qf7 18. Bxc5 Be6 19. b3 $13 {The position is unclear chances for both sides!}) 12... gxf5 13. f3 $14 {With a complex but slightly better position for white. white has plan Nf2 then g4 and trying to get control of e4 square!} (13. f4 e4 14. Nf2 $13)) 12. Qd2 f5 13. f4 $1 {My pieces are developed and centralized so it's time to start action in the center.} g5 $5 {Full battle!} (13... fxe4 14. Nxe4 Bf5 15. Ndf2 $16) (13... exf4 $6 14. Bxf4 Bd4+ 15. Kh1 Qe7 (15... Nf6 16. e5 $16) 16. exf5 Bxf5 17. Rae1 $16) 14. g3 (14. fxe5 f4 15. Bf2 dxe5 $13) (14. fxg5 f4 15. Bf2 Qxg5 $13) 14... gxf4 15. gxf4 Nac7 16. fxe5 dxe5 17. Bg5 $1 Qd6 18. exf5 Bxf5 19. Kh1 e4 20. Nf2 {Maintaining the presure on e4 pawn.} (20. Nf4 $5 $16) (20. Rxf5 $3 {This is the engine suggestion} Rxf5 21. Nxe4 $18 { Amazingly black is lost! You can check the variations with and engine if you want, the game continuation was too complex!}) 20... Nf6 21. Rg1 $16 Kh8 22. Bf4 Qd7 23. Rg3 Rf7 24. Rag1 Rg8 25. Be5 $5 Nce8 26. Qf4 Re7 27. Rg5 Bg6 28. Qh4 b5 $2 {Desperation in time pressure..} 29. Ng4 $1 Nxg4 30. Bxg4 Qb7 31. Rxg6 $1 Rxe5 32. Be6 Rf8 33. Nxb5 (33. Nxe4 $18) 33... e3 34. Nd6 $1 Nxd6 35. Rxg7 Qxg7 36. Rxg7 Kxg7 37. Qg3+ Kf6 38. Qf4+ Nf5 39. Bxf5 Rxf5 40. Qh6+ Kf7 41. Qxe3 Kg6 42. Qxc5 {and I achieved my Grandmaster norm!} 1-0

IM Himanshu Sharma

GM-elect Himanshu Sharma of India played well and scored 6.5/9, securing the fourth position.  His last round loss against GM Bachmann cost him yet another GM norm, but now, all he needs is the magical rating figure of 2500.

 

He played some aggressive chess in this tournament. Let’s have a look at his dynamic game against GM Miguel Munoz from Spain where he shows us the power of two bishops.

[Event "XVIII Obert Internacional Sant Martí 20"] [Site "Barcelona. Carrer Selva de Ma"] [Date "2016.07.18"] [Round "6.8"] [White "Himanshu, Sharma"] [Black "Munoz, Miguel"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "A00"] [WhiteElo "2389"] [BlackElo "2477"] [PlyCount "67"] [EventDate "2016.07.13"] [EventRounds "9"] [EventCountry "ESP"] [SourceDate "2003.06.08"] 1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qa5 4. d4 Nf6 5. Nf3 Bg4 6. Bd2 a6 7. h3 Bxf3 8. Qxf3 Nc6 9. O-O-O O-O-O 10. d5 $1 {White is having Bishop pair so he sacrifices a pawn to open up position for his bishops !} Nxd5 11. Bc4 Nxc3 12. Bxc3 {now Bishops are ready, Looking at both sides! Black is already in difficult position..} Qg5+ 13. Kb1 e5 $2 14. Bxa6 {winning a pawn with small tactic!} Qf6 (14... bxa6 15. Qxc6 $18) 15. Qg4+ {white wants keep queens on the board!} Kb8 16. Rxd8+ Nxd8 17. Bc4 Bd6 18. Re1 h5 19. Qe2 Re8 20. a4 { going to break castled king's shelter!!} Qg6 21. g4 hxg4 22. hxg4 Qg5 23. a5 e4 $6 24. Bd3 $1 {winning the pawn!} e3 25. fxe3 Bg3 26. Rf1 g6 27. e4 Be5 28. Bd2 Qe7 29. a6 b6 30. Bb5 c6 31. Bc4 b5 32. Bxb5 {Final blow!} cxb5 33. Qxb5+ Kc8 34. a7 {This game shows the power of two bishops!} 1-0

Indian champion GM Murali Karthikeyan had a solid tournament, finishing fifth with 6.5/9 on tiebreak.  

Cuban GM Camilo Ernesto Gomez Garrido finished sixth with 6.5/9 points on tiebreak.

Fifteen women took part in the event — 3 WIMs, 6 WFMs, and 1 WCM, and they showed some good chess.

Indian WIM Parnali Dharia won the Best Woman’s prize scoring 6.0/9 points!

Iran's Niusha Afsher (1971).

WFM Lucia Ganesta Olga from Cuba

WFM Mathilde Chung from Monaco 

Jose Antonio Herrera Reyes from Spain scored an International Master norm.

Let’s have look at his superb attacking game against GM Reynaldo Ortiz Suarez (2580) from Cuba.

[Event "XVIII Obert Internacional Sant Martí 20"] [Site "Barcelona. Carrer Selva de Ma"] [Date "2016.07.14"] [Round "2.3"] [White "Ortiz Suarez, Isan Reynaldo"] [Black "Herrera Reyes, Jose Antonio"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "A00"] [WhiteElo "2580"] [BlackElo "2253"] [PlyCount "72"] [EventDate "2016.07.13"] [EventRounds "9"] [EventCountry "ESP"] [SourceDate "2003.06.08"] 1. Nf3 c5 2. c4 Nf6 3. Nc3 e6 4. e3 Be7 5. d4 O-O 6. dxc5 Na6 7. Qc2 Nb4 8. Qb1 a5 9. a3 Na6 10. b4 b6 11. Na4 axb4 12. Nxb6 Rb8 13. axb4 Nxc5 $1 14. Nxc8 (14. bxc5 Bxc5 {winning back the sacrificed piece!!}) 14... Qxc8 15. Ba3 d5 16. Nd4 Nce4 17. Bd3 e5 18. Ne2 {White's king is still in the centre so black exploits this with a good sacrifice.. breaking white's castle and taking up the advantage of his lead in development!} Nxf2 $3 19. Kxf2 $6 {accepting the challenge!} (19. Bf5 {would have been a better choice..} Qxc4 20. Kxf2 g6 21. Bd3 Qh4+ 22. Kg1 Ng4 $15) 19... e4 20. cxd5 Qf5+ 21. Nf4 g5 $1 22. g4 Nxg4+ 23. Ke2 Nxe3 24. Bxe4 Qxf4 25. Qd3 Bc5 $1 {Beauty.. clearing the e-file for Rook!} 26. Bxh7+ (26. bxc5 Rfe8 $19) 26... Kh8 27. Qe4 Nxd5 28. Qxf4 (28. Qxd5 Qe3+ 29. Kd1 Rfd8 $19) 28... Nxf4+ 29. Kf3 Kxh7 30. bxc5 Rb3+ $19 {black emerged better after all these complications!} 31. Ke4 Ra8 32. Bb2 Re8+ 33. Kf5 Rxb2 34. h4 Ng6 35. hxg5+ Kg7 36. Rhe1 Rb4 0-1

Li Di (2426) From China achieved an International Master norm scoring 6.0/9 points.

He has annotated one really interesting game for us. It is even more curious when you see that he has analysed a game that he lost. This game reminds me of Philidor’s famous saying 'Pawns are Soul of Chess'.

[Event "XVIII Obert Internacional"] [Site "?"] [Date "2016.07.18"] [Round "?"] [White "Li Di"] [Black "Oliva Castaneda Kevel"] [Result "0-1"] [ECO "E97"] [WhiteElo "2426"] [BlackElo "2491"] [PlyCount "84"] [EventDate "2016.??.??"] [SourceDate "2003.06.08"] 1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. c4 Bg7 4. Nc3 O-O 5. e4 d6 6. Be2 e5 7. O-O Nc6 8. dxe5 Nxe5 9. Nxe5 dxe5 {This variation is not popular. Because some players think this is equal. But it's not so simple.} 10. Qa4 $1 {White will play on the queenside. Sometimes a4 queen will win black a7 Pawn when both sides are fighting in the central open file. White often play b4 b5 to break (attack) black c6 pawn and strive for the d5 square for the c3 knight.} c6 {This is a natural move to control white c3 knight.} 11. Be3 Qc7 (11... Be6 12. Rfd1 Qc7 13. b4 Nd7 14. c5 Rfe8 15. Qc2 Bf8 $11 {Landa-Adhiban Hasselbacken Open 05.05. 2016}) 12. Rfd1 (12. h3 $1 Be6 13. Rfd1 Rfd8 (13... b6 $6 14. b4) 14. Rxd8+ Qxd8 15. Rd1 Qc7 16. b4 a6 17. Qa5 Qxa5 18. bxa5 Bf8 19. Rb1 Rb8 20. g4 (20. Ba7 Rd8 21. Rxb7 Rd2 22. Be3 Rc2 23. Rb3 Nxe4 24. Nxe4 Rxe2 $13) 20... h5 21. f3 $11) 12... Bg4 $5 {interesting move} (12... Be6 $6 13. Bc5 Rfd8 14. Rxd8+ Qxd8 (14... Rxd8 15. Qxa7 Rd2 16. b3 Bh6 17. Rd1) 15. Rd1 Nd7 16. Qb4 $1 (16. Be3 Bf8 17. b4 a5 18. b5 Qc7 19. Qc2 Nc5 $11) 16... b6 17. Bd6 $14 {White has the initiative}) 13. f3 $6 (13. Bxg4 $1 Nxg4 14. Bc5 Rfd8 15. Rxd8+ Qxd8 16. Rd1 Qh4 17. h3 Bf8 $1 {I see the Bf8 and finished my calculation there, but in this position white has a strong resource} 18. Bxa7 $3 Bc5 19. Bxc5 Rxa4 20. Nxa4 Nh6 21. Nc3 {Black queen looks stupid on the h4 square, b7 weakness is not easy to defend. Rd7-Rb7 is coming and white is having advantage!!}) 13... Be6 14. b4 {If white dark bishop leaves the e3,Black will play bishop h6 solve his problems easily!} (14. Bc5 Rfe8 15. Bd6 Qb6+ {12....Bg4!}) 14... Nd7 15. Qa5 $5 (15. Qb3 $1 Rfc8 (15... b5 $2 16. a4 bxa4 17. Qxa4 Rfb8 18. b5 Bf8 19. bxc6 Bc5 20. Bxc5 Nxc5 21. Qa3 Qxc6 22. Nd5 Bxd5 23. cxd5 Qb6 24. Qe3 $14) 16. a4 Bf8 17. a5 b6 18. Nd5 $1 {A beautiful move!!} (18. a6 $6 b5 19. Rac1 Qb8) 18... Qb8 19. a6 b5 20. c5 h5 (20... cxd5 21. exd5 Bf5 22. g4 $18 {pawns dominate on all black's pieces!!}) 21. Qb2 cxd5 22. exd5 Bf5 23. Ra5 $13) 15... b6 (15... Qxa5 16. bxa5 Rfc8 17. Rab1 b6 18. Na4 bxa5 (18... Bf8 $1 19. Rd2 bxa5 20. Rb7 Nb6 $11) 19. Rb7 Rd8 20. Rc7 {white has a big compensation. All the pieces are active}) 16. Qa6 (16. Qa3 $1 Rfc8 17. Nd5 $1 Qd8 $1 (17... cxd5 18. cxd5 Nf8 19. dxe6 Nxe6 20. Rac1 Qe7 21. Bc4 a5 $1 (21... Bf8 22. Bd5 Rab8 23. Qb3) 22. Bd5 Rab8 (22... axb4 23. Bxa8 bxa3 24. Rxc8+ $18) 23. Rxc8+ Rxc8 24. Bxe6 fxe6 {white has a advantages but not enough to win}) 18. Qb2 (18. b5 cxd5 19. cxd5 Bf8 20. Qb2 Bh3 21. gxh3 Qf6 {Black has enough compensation with dark squares.}) 18... Qe8 19. Rac1 b5 $132) 16... Rfc8 {I don't know how my opponent should think in this position. I can't find a good plan for black. Maybe Bf8 Be7 h5,h4? I don't know.} (16... f5 $2 17. c5 $1 f4 18. Bf2 bxc5 19. bxc5 {White prepare exchange the black good bishop}) 17. Rab1 (17. Nd5 $2 { this time its not working} cxd5 18. cxd5 Nb8 19. Qa3 Bd7 $17) 17... Bf8 18. a3 {I worry about black 18....Nb8 19. Qa4 a5 20.b5 Bb4!? So I played a3 so fast. But this plan is very stupid.} (18. Kh1 $1 Nb8 19. Qa4 a5 $2 20. b5 Bb4 21. Nd5 $1 {I didn't see this move} cxd5 22. cxd5 Bc5 23. Bxc5 Qxc5 24. dxe6 fxe6 25. Qb3 {white is clear better}) 18... Be7 $6 (18... h5 $5 {Black has a nice pawn structure than white in the kingside. Now, because of the bishop pair, he must push the h-pawn, try to open up the position keep the bishop unblocked, it's easy to understand!} 19. Rd2 h4 20. Rbd1 Nf6) 19. Nd5 $3 {Finally it came.} cxd5 20. cxd5 Nb8 $6 (20... Nc5 $1 21. bxc5 Bxc5 22. Qd3 (22. Bxc5 Qxc5+ 23. Kh1 Bd7 24. a4 Qf2 25. Rdc1 Kg7 $11) 22... Bd7 23. Rdc1 Qd6 24. Rb3 Bxe3+ 25. Qxe3 Rxc1+ 26. Qxc1 Rc8 $11) 21. Qd3 Rd8 22. Rbc1 Qb7 23. Qc3 $1 Bc8 24. Qxe5 { white opens the a1-h8. And all black's pieces are on the backrank!} Bd6 25. Qf6 $6 (25. Qg5 $1 Rf8 (25... Qe7 26. e5 $1 h6 27. Qxe7 Bxe7 28. Bxh6 $16) (25... Re8 26. Bb5 $1 Nd7 (26... Bd7 27. Bd4 $1 Be7 28. Qh6 f6 (28... Bf8 29. Qf4 $18) 29. Bc4 {black will lose in this position}) 27. Bc6 Qb8 28. Bxa8 Qxa8 29. Bf4 $16) 26. Qf6 Qe7 27. Qxe7 Bxe7 28. d6 Bf6 29. e5 $1 Bg7 30. f4 $16 {ugly for black}) 25... Qe7 26. Qxe7 Bxe7 27. e5 Bd7 $6 (27... Bf8 $1 28. d6 (28. Rc7 a5 $1 29. Bg5 (29. Bxb6 axb4 30. axb4 Nd7 31. Bd4 Bxb4 32. e6 Bd6 33. Rc2 Nf8 34. Bf6 Re8 35. Bb5 Bb7 36. Bxe8 Rxe8 $11) 29... Re8 30. Bb5 Na6 31. Bxe8 Nxc7 32. Bc6 Rb8 33. d6 Ne6 34. Bf6 $16) 28... Be6 29. Rc7 Nd7 30. f4 f6 {break the center pawn} 31. Bd4 fxe5 32. fxe5 Bg7 33. Bf3 Rac8 34. Bb7 Rb8 35. Re1 Nf8) 28. Rc7 $2 (28. d6 $1 Bf8 29. Rc7 $1 {It's difficult for Black to continue, white has a strong center pawn chain d6,e5..} Be6 30. Bg5 Nd7 (30... Rc8 31. Bc4 $3 Rxc7 32. dxc7 Nc6 33. Ba6 h6 34. Bb7 $18) (30... Re8 31. Bb5) 31. Bxd8 Rxd8 32. f4 {block the dark bishop}) 28... Rc8 $11 29. Rxc8+ Bxc8 {Now black can defend!! He will play Bd8 at some point to control queenside!!} 30. Rc1 Nd7 31. f4 Nf8 32. Bf3 Bd8 33. g4 (33. e6 $1 {try to block the another bishop} Rb8 34. f5 $1 Bb7 35. Bf4 Rc8 36. Re1 $1 fxe6 37. fxe6 Bh4 38. g3 Be7 39. d6 $36) 33... Bb7 34. Kf2 Rc8 35. f5 Rxc1 36. Bxc1 Nd7 37. Bb2 b5 $6 (37... Bh4+ 38. Kg2 Kf8 39. e6 fxe6 40. fxe6 Nf6 41. d6 Ne4 42. Bxe4 Bxe4+ 43. Kh3 Bg5 44. Kg3 Bd5 45. h4 Bxh4+ 46. Kxh4 Bxe6 $11) 38. e6 $2 {Now,I was in time trouble} (38. d6 Bh4+ (38... Bb6+ 39. Kg3 Bxf3 40. Kxf3 gxf5 41. gxf5 Kf8 42. Ke4 Bg1 43. e6 fxe6 44. fxe6 {white has a good chance to win}) 39. Ke2 Bc8 $3 40. e6 fxe6 41. fxe6 Nb6 42. d7 Nxd7 43. exd7 Bxd7 $11) 38... Nb6 $2 (38... Bh4+ $1 39. Kg2 Nb6 40. Kh3 Bg5 41. Bc1 Be7 42. d6 Bxf3 43. dxe7 Bc6 44. Kh4 fxe6 45. fxe6 Nd5 $19) 39. d6 $2 (39. f6 $1 fxe6 40. dxe6 Bd5 $1 (40... Bxf3 41. Kxf3 Nc4 42. Bc3 Kf8 43. Ke4 a6 44. Kd5 Bxf6 45. Bxf6 Nxa3 46. Kc6 {Black cannot save the game})) 39... Bh4+ $1 40. Kg2 Bxf3+ 41. Kxf3 fxe6 42. fxe6 Nc4 $19 0-1

Talented Chinese player WFM Qiu Mengjie achieved a WIM norm after scoring 5.5/9.

She has analysed her win over IM Ortega Mariano(2465) for ChessBase India.

[Event "Sant Marti International Open 2016"] [Site "?"] [Date "2016.07.18"] [Round "7.10"] [White "Qiu, Mengjie"] [Black "Ortega Amarelle, Mariano"] [Result "1-0"] [ECO "B42"] [WhiteElo "2231"] [BlackElo "2465"] [PlyCount "65"] [EventDate "2016.??.??"] [SourceDate "2003.06.08"] 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 a6 5. Bd3 g6 {It's a rare line.} 6. O-O ( 6. c4 {Is another popular alternative.. after which play usually develops like. .} Bg7 7. Be3 Ne7 (7... Nc6) 8. O-O O-O 9. Nc3 d5 {The position will open up!!} ) 6... Bg7 7. Be3 Ne7 8. Nd2 (8. c4 Nbc6 9. Nxc6 bxc6 10. c5 Rb8 (10... Bxb2 11. Nd2 Bxa1 (11... O-O) 12. Qxa1 O-O 13. Bh6 f6 $44 {White has sacrificed an exchange but the position is quite interesting..!!}) 11. Na3 a5 12. Nc4) (8. Nc3 {This move is more natural then I played in the game.I was concerned about Nbc6,so I decided to support d4 knight with pawn and consolidate the central.} O-O (8... Nbc6 9. Nxc6 bxc6 10. Na4 Rb8 11. c3) 9. f4 d5 10. e5 f6) 8... Nbc6 9. c3 O-O 10. Qe2 (10. Nxc6 bxc6 11. Qb3 d5 12. Bc5 {is possible!!}) (10. f4 { seems a reasonable move,but with 10...Nd4 11.cd d5, there is nothing good for white} Nxd4 11. cxd4 d5) 10... f5 $6 {I don't think it's a good choice for black. d5 and Nd4 looks more reasonable. f5 is risky and he makes weaknesses himself.} (10... e5 11. Nxc6 bxc6 12. Nc4) (10... d5 {this is a better option..} 11. Nxc6 Nxc6 (11... bxc6 12. f4 (12. Bc5 e5) 12... Rb8 13. Nb3 dxe4 14. Bxe4 Nd5 15. Ba7 Rb7 16. Bc5 Re8 17. Rad1) 12. Nf3 Bd7) (10... Nxd4 11. Bxd4 (11. cxd4 Nc6 12. e5 d6 13. f4) 11... Bxd4 12. cxd4 d5 13. e5) 11. exf5 gxf5 (11... Nxd4 12. Bxd4 Bxd4 13. cxd4 Nxf5 14. d5 Ng7 15. Be4 Nh5 16. Qe3 Nf6 17. dxe6 dxe6 18. Rad1 {I analysed this line during the game, still a pleasant position for white,but better than the position in the game for black.}) 12. Nxc6 bxc6 { Black made weaknesses on black squares.I played so quickly in this crucial position. Obviously,to control the black square,Bc5 is more effective.} (12... Nxc6 13. Nc4 b5 14. Nb6 Rb8 15. Nxc8 Rxc8 16. a4) 13. Bg5 (13. Nc4 Nd5 14. Bc5 (14. Nd6 Nxe3 15. Qxe3 Qc7 16. Qg3) 14... Rf6 15. f4 {controlling dark squares!!}) 13... Qe8 {Qe8 doesn't solve the weakness of dark squares and c8 bishop is feeling a bit uncomfortable now instead d5 is more active.} (13... d5 14. Nf3 Qd6 15. Rfe1 Ng6 16. h4 Rb8 (16... e5 17. h5 e4 18. hxg6 Qxg6 19. Bf4 Qg4 20. g3 exf3 21. Qe7) 17. h5 Nf4 18. Bxf4 Qxf4 19. Bxa6 Bd7 20. a4 Rfe8 21. g3 Qc7 22. h6 Bxh6 23. b4 {with chances for both sides..}) 14. Nc4 Nd5 15. f4 { The purpose is to fix the black pawn structure, then white will have long term advantage of weak dark squares and c8 bishop is doomed!} h6 16. Bh4 (16. Nd6 Qg6 17. Bh4 a5 18. Rf3) 16... a5 {difficult position for black.a5,to solve the problem of c8 bishop} 17. Nd6 Qg6 18. Kh1 {this move is too slow,and useless. I was over confident about my position, though I can still control it easily, but Kh1 is obviously not so wise!} ({Rook lift would have been better} 18. Rf3 Qg4 19. Qf2 Kh8 20. Be2 Ba6 21. c4 Nf6 22. h3 Qg6 23. Rg3 Qh7 $16) 18... Qg4 19. Qf2 (19. Qxg4 {I am not satisfied about the position after the exchange of queens, so I decided to keep queens on the board.} fxg4 20. f5 Ba6 (20... e5 21. Rae1 Ba6 22. Bxa6 Rxa6 23. c4 Nf6 24. Rxe5) 21. Bxa6 Rxa6 22. fxe6 dxe6) 19... Ba6 20. Bxa6 Rxa6 21. Rad1 Rb8 (21... c5 22. Nc4 (22. Rxd5 exd5 23. Be7 Rb8 24. Qc2 (24. Qxc5 Qe2 25. Qxd5+ Kh7)) 22... d6 23. Qe1 (23. Rd3 a4 24. Rg3 Qh5 25. Rh3 Qf7) 23... Qg6 24. Qe2 Qf7 25. Rd2 (25. Ne5 dxe5 26. Qxa6 Ne3) (25. Rde1 Nc7) 25... Re8) 22. Rd3 Qxf4 $2 (22... Kh7 23. h3 Qh5 24. Rg1 Bf6 (24... Rab6 25. Nc4 Ra6 26. g4 fxg4 27. hxg4 Qe8 28. Rh3) 25. Bxf6 Nxf6 26. c4 { this position seems to be better for white but black is still alive!!}) (22... c5 23. Nc4 a4 24. Ne3 Nxe3 25. Rxe3 $14) 23. Qxf4 Nxf4 24. Rxf4 Rxb2 25. g4 $1 {the only move to reach a winning position. otherwise,white will have hard position for winning.} (25. Rf1 Rxa2 26. Ne8 Be5 (26... d5 27. Rg3) 27. Rxd7 Bxc3 28. Nf6+ Kf8 29. Nh7+ Kg8 30. Bf6 Bxf6 31. Nxf6+ Kf8 32. Rc7 $18) 25... Rxa2 26. gxf5 Rb6 27. Rf1 Rbb2 28. Bg3 exf5 (28... a4 29. Rg1) 29. Nxf5 Rd2 30. Rdf3 Bf8 31. Rg1 (31. Be5 d6 (31... Rg2 32. Ne3) 32. Nxd6) 31... Bc5 (31... Kh7 32. Nd4 (32. Ne3 Bg7 33. Nc4 Re2 34. Rf7 Kh8 35. Rxd7 Bxc3 36. Nd6) 32... Bg7 33. Rf7 Kg6 34. Rxd7 Bxd4 35. cxd4 $18) 32. Nd4 Bxd4 33. cxd4 1-0

Russian WFM Victoria Chernyak achieved a WIM Norm

11-year-old Rakshitta Ravi (1716) from India was the highest rating gainer of this tournament. She increased 146 Elo.

Another 10-year-old Indian kid CM Leon Luke Mendonca, already a 1964 rated player, increased his rating by 94 points.

The organizing team

The efficient and always helpful arbiters' team led by Chief Arbiter Dr. Vladimir Zaiats did a fantastic job of conducting this tournament efficiently. Every day, the team would record all the games on ChessBase and make it available on chess-results. It was a nice gesture by organisers.

 

Kudos to tournament Director Mr. Ruiz Mata Oscar for conducting such a well-organized tournament.

Photographer:

Mr. Paul Duran Pascual is a very enthusiastic photographer. All the pictures in this report were taken by him. He learnt chess from his father and he enjoys playing it. Photography is his passion. He maintains a blog related to it.

Atul Dahale

Atul Dahale is one of the first Internationally FIDE rated players from Parbhani, Maharashtra. He loves the game of chess and enjoys the fact that he can travel to different places, meet people and make new friends thanks to the game. He is a successful coach currently based in Pune, Maharashtra. You can contact him on atuldahale64@gmail.com.