chessbase india logo

IIFL Wealth 08: Aditya Mittal takes flight!

by Priyadarshan Banjan - 07/02/2016

Aditya Mittal flew into the sole lead with a crushing victory over Sankarsha Shelke. Something similar happened in the Open as well, where Swapnil cleaned up Himal Gusain to become the sole leader. We bring you a pictorial report in black and white with analysis by Swapnil and Stany.

IIFL Wealth 08: Aditya Mittal takes flight!

The Junior tournament finally saw a leader at the top as Aditya Mittal of Mumbai managed to win his game, while others drew, to take the top spot going into the final round with 7.0/8.

The round began with the second seed Raunak Sadhwani (2104) taking on the top seed Rehman

 The game developed into a closed position where the players settled for a draw

This allowed Aditya Mittal (1960) to waltz into the lead after he beat...

...Sankarsha Shelke (2032), who seems to be overworked as he is playing in both the Open and the Junior tournament.
[Event "IIFL Wealth 1st Mumbai-Junior U13"]
[Site "Mumbai"]
[Date "2016.02.04"]
[Round "8"]
[White "Aditya Mittal"]
[Black "Shelke Sankarsha"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "A50"]
[WhiteElo "1960"]
[BlackElo "2032"]
[PlyCount "78"]
[EventDate "2016.??.??"]
[EventCountry "IND"]
[TimeControl "40/5400+30:1800+30"]
1. d4 {0} Nf6 {0} 2. c4 {0} Nc6 {0} 3. Nc3 {27} e5 {0} 4. d5 {7} Ne7 {0} 5. e3
{320} Ng6 {282} 6. Bd3 {75} Bb4 {85} 7. Bd2 {76} a6 {553} 8. Nge2 {214} O-O {69
} 9. O-O {48} d6 {109} 10. a3 {300} Bc5 {149} 11. b4 {148} Ba7 {4} 12. Ng3 {83}
Bd7 {146} 13. a4 {110} c6 {678} 14. dxc6 {960} bxc6 {48} 15. a5 {304} Ne8 {743}
16. Na4 {339} Nc7 {285} 17. c5 {135} d5 {86} 18. Nb6 {118} Rb8 {43} 19. e4 {367
} d4 {62} 20. Nf5 {188} Ne7 {195} 21. Nd6 {198} Nb5 {282} 22. Bxb5 {101} cxb5 {
58} 23. f4 {168} Bxb6 {510} 24. axb6 {17} Nc8 {24} 25. fxe5 {112} Nxd6 {12} 26.
exd6 {2} Bc6 {9} 27. Qg4 {641} Re8 {437} 28. Bg5 {104} Qd7 {31} 29. Qxd7 {29}
Bxd7 {5} 30. Be7 {88} Bc6 {82} 31. Rxa6 {75} Bxe4 {18} 32. Ra7 {83} d3 {26} 33.
d7 {137} Rxe7 {13} 34. d8=Q+ {2} Rxd8 {12} 35. Rxe7 {3} f5 {6} 36. b7 {53} d2 {
6} 37. Rd1 {15} Kf8 {12} 38. Rc7 {12} Ke8 {12} 39. Rxd2 {18} Ra8 1-0

 

Ridit Nimdia's meditation helped him hold...

...Shuban Saha in the third board.

Aditya Savalkar takes stock of the recapture possibilities in the position.

 That is a unique way to bring a smile on your face.

 

Among the strategies employed were sweater-biting and...

...identity-card biting.

The calm, the focus!

Some kids were bored with their position...

...while some badly needed a wake-up call.

However, most of them were busy calculating at a furious pace.

Ridit Nimdia won the Game of the Day prize -- a ChessBase India gift hamper. 

View the pairing for Round 09 here.

Complete results of Round 08.

Watch the games LIVE by clicking the above link.

IIFL Wealth Mumbai International Open 2016

In this crucial penultimate round clash, Swapnil was able to outwit Himal, almost without any roadblocks.

Notes by GM Swapnil Dhopade:

[Event "1st IIFL Wealth Open, Mumbai, 2016"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2016.02.04"]
[Round "8.1"]
[White "Gusain, Himal"]
[Black "Dhopade, Swapnil"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "B19"]
[WhiteElo "2335"]
[BlackElo "2488"]
[PlyCount "122"]
[EventDate "2016.??.??"]
1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 dxe4 4. Nxe4 Bf5 5. Ng3 Bg6 6. h4 h6 7. Nf3 Nd7 8. h5
Bh7 9. Bd3 Bxd3 10. Qxd3 e6 11. Bd2 Ngf6 12. O-O-O Be7 13. Kb1 O-O 14. Ne4 Nxe4
15. Qxe4 Nf6 16. Qe2 Qd5 17. Be3 Qb5 $5 {this is an interesting line here. I
think black is fine in this variation.} (17... b5 18. c4) 18. c4 Qf5+ 19. Ka1
c5 20. Nh4 (20. Ne5 cxd4 21. Bxd4 Rfd8 22. Qe3 Bd6 23. g4 Qe4 24. Qxe4 Nxe4 25.
Nd3 Be7 26. Be3 Bf6 27. f3 Nd6 28. c5 Nc4 29. Bc1 Rd5 30. Kb1 Rad8 31. Kc2 Ne5
32. Nxe5 Rxc5+ 33. Kb3 Rxe5 34. Rxd8+ Bxd8 35. Rd1 Bf6 36. a4 Rd5 37. Rxd5 exd5
38. Be3 a6 39. Kc2 Kf8 40. Bb6 Ke7 41. b4 Kd6 42. Kd3 Kc6 43. Be3 b5 44. a5 Kd6
45. Bd2 Bb2 46. Be3 Ke5 47. f4+ Ke6 48. Bd4 Bxd4 49. Kxd4 g6 50. Kc5 f5 51.
hxg6 fxg4 52. f5+ Kf6 53. Kd6 g3 54. g7 Kxg7 55. Ke7 g2 56. f6+ Kh7 {0-1 (56)
Shyam,N (2436)-Swapnil,S (2497) Thiruvarur 2015}) 20... Qh7 21. g4 (21. d5 exd5
22. cxd5 Rad8 23. Qf3 Qe4 24. Nf5 Rfe8 25. Qxe4 Nxe4 26. f3 Nd6 27. Nxe7+ Rxe7
28. Bxc5 b6 29. Bb4 Re2 30. g4 Nc4 31. Rd4 Ne3 32. Kb1 Nc2 33. Rd2 Rxd2 34.
Bxd2 Nd4 35. Rd1 Nxf3 36. Bf4 f6 37. Kc2 Ne5 38. Bxe5 fxe5 39. Kb3 Kf7 40. Kc4
Ke7 41. Rf1 Rd7 42. b3 Kd6 43. Rf8 Rc7+ 44. Kd3 Kxd5 45. Rd8+ Ke6 46. Ke4 Rc2
47. Re8+ Kf7 48. Rxe5 Rxa2 49. Rf5+ Ke6 50. Re5+ Kd6 51. Rd5+ Kc6 52. Rd8 Rf2
53. Ke5 Rf7 54. Ke6 Rf4 55. g5 hxg5 56. Rd6+ Kc5 57. Rd5+ Kb4 58. Rxg5 Kxb3 59.
Rxg7 Rh4 60. Rg5 a5 61. Kf6 a4 62. Rg3+ Kb4 63. Kg5 Rh2 64. Rg4+ Kb3 65. Rg3+
Kb2 66. Rg4 Kb3 67. Rg3+ Kb4 68. Rg4+ Ka5 69. Rg3 b5 70. h6 b4 71. Kg6 a3 72.
Kg7 a2 73. Rg1 b3 74. h7 b2 {0-1 (74) Sengupta,D (2538)-Evdokimov,A (2558) New
Delhi 2014}) 21... cxd4 22. Bxd4 Qe4 23. Qd2 $2 (23. Qxe4 $142 Nxe4 24. Nf3
Rfd8 25. Rhe1 f5 26. gxf5 exf5 27. Rc1 Rd7 28. Rg1 Ng5 29. Nxg5 Bxg5 30. Be3 f4
31. Bc5 f3 32. Rc3 Rad8 33. a4 b6 34. Be3 Bxe3 35. Rxe3 Rd3 36. Rge1 R8d4 37.
Re8+ Kh7 38. Rf8 Rd1+ 39. Rxd1 Rxd1+ 40. Ka2 Rh1 41. b4 Rxh5 42. Kb3 {1/2-1/2 
(42) Abasov,N (2511)-Tari,A (2518) Khanty-Mansiysk 2015}) 23... Rfd8 24. f3 Qc6
25. Qe2 Rac8 26. Ng2 (26. b3 $2 {is met by...} Nxg4 $1 27. fxg4 (27. Qg2 Rxd4
$1) 27... Rxd4 $19) 26... Qxc4 27. Qxc4 Rxc4 28. Bxa7 Nd5 $2 {throwing away a
great part of the advantage.} (28... Ra8 29. Bd4 Nd5 $17) 29. Ne3 Rf4 30. Nxd5
exd5 31. Rd3 (31. Rhf1 $142) 31... f5 $1 $15 32. gxf5 $6 {this ruins whites
kingside structure.} (32. Rg1 $142 Bf6 $15 {black still keeps some pressure.})
32... Bf6 $1 {nice intermediate move preventing Bd4.} (32... Rxf5 33. Bd4) 33.
a3 Rxf5 34. Bf2 Kf7 35. Ka2 d4 36. Bh4 Rdd5 37. Bxf6 Kxf6 38. a4 Rxh5 39. Rxh5
Rxh5 40. Rxd4 Re5 {I assesed this endgame as better for black due to the
passed h-pawn. While white will need some time to create his own passer.} 41.
Rf4+ Kg6 42. Rg4+ Kf6 43. Rf4+ Kg6 44. Rg4+ $2 (44. b4 h5 45. a5 {I am still
not sure about this endgame, but blacks chances look preferable.}) 44... Kh7 $1
45. Rb4 Re7 46. Rb6 h5 $19 {black is already winning. The h-pawn is too fast.}
47. a5 h4 48. Rb4 g5 49. Rg4 Kg6 50. f4 Kf5 51. Rxg5+ Kxf4 52. Rh5 Kg4 53. Rh8
Re5 54. b4 h3 55. Kb3 Rh5 56. Rg8+ Kh4 57. Rc8 h2 58. Rc1 Kg3 59. b5 h1=Q 60.
Rxh1 Rxh1 61. Kc4 Rh6 0-1

A round before, he had beaten IM Stany

Notes by GM Swapnil Dhopade:

[Event "1st IIFL Wealth Open, Mumbai, 2016"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2016.02.03"]
[Round "7.1"]
[White "Dhopade, Swapnil"]
[Black "Stany, G.A."]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "D90"]
[WhiteElo "2488"]
[BlackElo "2421"]
[PlyCount "77"]
[EventDate "2016.??.??"]
1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. cxd5 Nxd5 6. Na4 Nf6 7. g3 $5 {
I knew Bf4 is the main move here, but while thinking on the board I thought
that this isnt bad either.} (7. Bf4 O-O 8. e3 c6 9. a3 (9. Nc3 Bg4 10. Be2 Nbd7
11. Qb3 Qb6 12. O-O Be6 13. Qa3 Rfe8 14. Rfc1 Nd5 15. Bg3 a5 16. Ng5 Nf8 17.
Bc4 Nxc3 18. Nxe6 Ne2+ 19. Bxe2 Nxe6 20. Rab1 Nf8 21. Qc3 e6 22. b4 axb4 23.
Rxb4 Qa7 24. a4 Rad8 25. Rcb1 Rd7 26. Bf3 h5 27. h3 Nh7 {1/2-1/2 (72) Bu,X
(2607)-Sasikiran,K (2657) ICC INT 2005}) (9. Bd3 Qa5+ 10. Nc3 c5 11. O-O cxd4
12. Nxd4 Nc6 13. Nb3 Qb6 14. Rc1 Bg4 15. Qe1 Rfd8 16. Bc4 Qb4 17. Nb5 Nh5 18.
Bc7 Qxe1 19. Rfxe1 {1/2-1/2 (79) Sengupta,D (2589)-Vidit,S (2651) Thiruvarur
2015}) 9... Bg4 10. Be2 Nh5 11. Bxb8 Rxb8 12. O-O e5 13. dxe5 Bxf3 14. Bxf3
Qxd1 15. Raxd1 Bxe5 16. Bxh5 gxh5 17. Nc5 Rfe8 18. b4 {1-0 (56) Bu,X (2615)
-Smerdon,D (2425) Mallorca 2004}) 7... b6 $6 (7... Nc6 {might be a better way
to play.}) 8. Bg2 Bb7 9. O-O O-O 10. Bf4 Nbd7 11. Rc1 Rc8 12. Qb3 $1 $14 {
the problem with blacks position is that he is not getting both the c5 and e5
breaks. So his position remains passive.} e6 13. Rfd1 {all whites pieces are
placed of good squares.} Re8 (13... Qe7 14. Rxc7 Rxc7 15. Bxc7 Bd5 16. Qd3 $14)
14. Nc3 $1 {nice knight manuouvre. The knight want to go to the c6 square.} Nd5
15. Nb5 Nxf4 16. gxf4 Bd5 17. Qd3 a6 $6 (17... Nf6 $142) 18. Na7 Ra8 19. Nc6
Bxc6 20. Rxc6 $16 Nf6 21. e3 Nd5 22. a3 Ne7 23. Rc2 c5 $2 {an attempt to free
the position backfires for black.} 24. Ne5 Nd5 25. dxc5 bxc5 26. Nc6 $1 Qc8 27.
Rxc5 $18 Bxb2 28. Bxd5 exd5 29. Ne7+ Rxe7 30. Rxc8+ Rxc8 31. Qxa6 Rcc7 32. Rxd5
Ra7 33. Qc8+ Kg7 34. Rd8 f5 (34... h5) 35. Rg8+ Kh6 36. Qc6 Rg7 37. Rb8 Bxa3
38. Qf3 g5 39. Qh3+ 1-0

 

In his effort to rectify the loss to Swapnil, Stany played a beautiful king-hunt, a la Wei Yi, to get rid of Al Muthiah.

Notes by IM G. A. Stany:

[Event "IIfl Mumbai Open"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2016.02.04"]
[Round "8"]
[White "Stany.g.a"]
[Black "Muthaiah, Al"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B85"]
[WhiteElo "2421"]
[BlackElo "2275"]
[Annotator "Stany.g.a"]
[PlyCount "65"]
[EventDate "2016.??.??"]
[SourceDate "2003.06.08"]
1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nc3 Qc7 6. Be3 a6 7. Be2 Nf6 8.
O-O Be7 9. f4 d6 10. Qe1 O-O 11. Qg3 Nxd4 12. Bxd4 b5 13. a3 Bb7 14. Kh1 {
Till here both were playing playing fast. Now he started to think} Rfd8 $6 (
14... Bc6 {followed by Rad8 is the main line}) 15. Bd3 Ne8 {i just felt there
was something wrong with this move. I am playing Bd3 indirectly eyeing on h7
pawn and he's removing the protection from it.So immediately i tried to
exploit it with Qh3} 16. Qh3 e5 (16... h6 17. f5 e5 18. Be3) 17. Nd5 Bxd5 18.
exd5 Nf6 19. Bc3 $6 (19. fxe5 dxe5 20. Rxf6 Bxf6 21. Qxh7+ Kf8 22. Bc3 a5 23.
Bxb5 {Was clearly better.}) 19... g6 $2 (19... e4 {was almost forced} 20. Bxf6
exd3 21. Bxe7 Qxe7 22. Qxd3 Re8 {was the best way to defend}) 20. Rae1 $1 Nxd5
(20... exf4 21. Rxe7 Qxe7 22. Re1 Qd7 23. Bxf6) 21. fxe5 Nxc3 (21... dxe5 22.
Bxg6 $1 fxg6 (22... hxg6 23. Bxe5) 23. Qe6+ Kh8 24. Bxe5+) 22. Rxf7 $1 {
A typical Sacrifice in this Opening. I actually didn't calculate till the end.
I just knew there had to be a win and the sac is also justified because i
could take draw at any stage. So i felt safe} Kxf7 23. Qxh7+ Ke6 (23... Ke8 24.
e6) 24. exd6+ Kxd6 25. Qxg6+ Kd5 (25... Kd7 26. Qe6+ Ke8 27. Bg6+) (25... Kc5
26. b4+ Kd4 27. Qg4+ Kd5 28. Be4+ {was thinking to play this}) 26. Qe6+ Kd4 27.
bxc3+ Kxc3 28. Re4 $3 {To me this was the best move of the game. I took around
30 minutes to play this but made sure that i was winning} (28. Qb3+ Kd4 29.
Re4+ Kc5 30. Rxe7 Qd6 {White still has to struggle to get the point here})
28... Rh8 (28... Kd2 29. Qh6+ Kc3 30. Qg7+ $1 Kd2 31. Re2+ Kd1 32. Qa1#) 29. h3
$6 {Missing mate in 13!} (29. Qb3+ Kd2 30. Re2+ Kc1 31. Re1+ (31. h3 Qg3 {
and Black is winning here. This was the variation i was worried about}) 31...
Kd2 32. Rd1+ Kxd1 (32... Ke3 33. Bg6+ Kf4 34. Qg3#) 33. c3+ Ke1 34. Qb1+ Kd2
35. Qc2+ Ke3 36. Qe2+ Kf4 37. Qe4+ Kg5 {During the game i was calculating till
here but missed the next move. Thats why i rejected it} 38. Qg6+ $1 (38. Qf5+ {
I was only looking at this move}) 38... Kh4 (38... Kf4 39. Qf5+) 39. g3+ Qxg3
40. hxg3+ Kh3 41. Bf5#) 29... Qg3 30. Re3 $1 {Was my idea when i played Re4}
Qf4 31. Bxb5+ {When i played Re3 my intention was to play Be4 and Ba8. Only
after he played Qf4 did i realise that Bb5 is winning immediately} Qxe3 (31...
Kd2 32. Rd3+ Kc1 33. Qe1+ Kb2 34. Rb3+ Kxc2 35. Qb1+ Kd2 36. Qd3+ Kc1 37. Rb1#)
(31... Kb2 32. Qb3+ Kc1 33. Re1+ Kd2 34. Qd3+ Kxe1 35. Qe2#) 32. Qxe3+ Kb2 33.
Bc6 {Black resigned} 1-0

 

Bhavik Bharambe continued his solid run through the tournament by holding IM Ravi Teja (2385)

Thirteen-year-old Bhavik is widely believed to become Mumbai's next big thing and is trained by IM Sharad Tilak. Despite his obvious talent, fate is making sure that he is kept away from quality chess tournaments held outside of his city due to financial constraints.

 Shardul managed to beat FM Praggnanandhaa R.

Amardeep Bartakke (2084) caused a flutter when he beat IM Nitin (2400)

View the pairing for Round 09 here.

Complete results of Round 08.

Watch the games LIVE by clicking the above link.

Photos for ChessBase India