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Dubai 01-03: Gopal among the leaders

by Priyadarshan Banjan - 15/04/2016

Three rounds have ended at the eighteenth edition of Rashid Bin Hamdan Al Maktoum Cup, aka Dubai Open, that opened on 10 April 2016 night at the Dubai Chess and Culture Club. Nine grandmasters are in the lead with a perfect three and among them is India's thirty-second seed GM G.N. Gopal, who beat the inimitable Georgian Baadur Jobava! Quite a few Indians are also tied for the second spot after earning or dropping draws. We highlight some interesting moments.

Dubai 01-03: Gopal among the leaders

Dubai is a city known for its energy, optimism and openness to the people from across the globe. The emirate is a place that is constantly in flux and the world has witnessed it mature as a city and as a society.

 

The eighteenth edition of Rashid Bin Hamdan Al Maktoum Cup opened on 10 April 2016 night at the Dubai Chess and Culture Club. Some of the favourites easily put it across their opponents in the first three rounds' assignments, but a handful could only split the point — and some even had to throw in the towel.

Colourful attire to start a colourful tournament!

The tournament offers a total cash purse of US$50,000, with US$13,000 and the Rashid Bin Hamdan Cup going to the champion. A blitz tournament will be held on the rest day on Friday (April 15) with a total prize fund of US$4,000.

The playing arena

The tournament has established a new record in participation approximately 200 players from 41 countries, including 46 Grandmasters, of which 25 are rated above 2600. 60 competitors are Indians, with many youngsters hunting for norms and points.

The Asian Nations Cup 2016 champion — Team India — conveniently stayed back in UAE for the Dubai Open [Photo: Sarin Abdulsalam]

Top seed Bulgarian GM Ivan Chaparinov (2695) had no problems in dispatching Bodda Pratyusha in 48 moves of a Semi-Slav opening in the first round [Photo: Sarin Abdulsalam]

Second round: GM Debashis Das (2452) vs GM Ivan Cheparinov (2695)

Employing the Queen’s Indian Defence, Cheparinov dropped a pawn on move 38, but the double rook ending with all pawns on the kingside ensured that the Bulgarian had good chances of holding the draw. Debashis won a second pawn on move 59 to create two unopposed passed pawns, but his rook was passively defending both pawns and his king was trapped in the first rank, constantly under threat of mate, while Cheparinov’s rook and king enjoyed maximum activity to keep the game balanced.

[Event "18th DUBAI OPEN CHESS Tournament 2016"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2016.04.12"]
[Round "2.1"]
[White "Debashis, Das"]
[Black "Cheparinov, Ivan"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "E15"]
[WhiteElo "2452"]
[BlackElo "2695"]
[PlyCount "149"]
[EventDate "2016.??.??"]
[TimeControl "5400+30"]
[WhiteClock "0:00:54"]
[BlackClock "0:04:05"]
1. d4 {0} Nf6 {0} 2. c4 {3} e6 {0} 3. Nf3 {5} b6 {0} 4. g3 {121} Ba6 {0} 5. b3
{5} d5 {50} 6. Bg2 {52} Bb4+ {6} 7. Bd2 {25} Be7 {5} 8. O-O {137} O-O {7} 9.
cxd5 {138} exd5 {8} 10. Nc3 {3} Re8 {8} 11. Re1 {720} Bb7 {164} 12. Bc1 {306}
Na6 {480} 13. Bb2 {16} h6 {99} 14. Rc1 {69} c5 {257} 15. e3 {148} Rb8 {781} 16.
Re2 {154} Bf8 {315} 17. Rd2 {631} Qe7 {711} 18. Ne5 {133} Nc7 {221} 19. Ng4 {
223} Nxg4 {37} 20. Qxg4 {7} Qe6 {92} 21. Qxe6 {532} fxe6 {6} 22. dxc5 {57} Bxc5
{80} 23. e4 {264} Rbd8 {97} 24. exd5 {979} exd5 {130} 25. Rcd1 {209} Rf8 {25}
26. Na4 {190} Bd6 {164} 27. Nc3 {147} Bc5 {5} 28. Na4 {12} Bb4 {28} 29. Bc3 {55
} Bd6 {30} 30. Bd4 {58} Rf7 {193} 31. Nc3 {87} Bb4 {116} 32. Re2 {150} Kf8 {349
} 33. a3 {233} Bxa3 {316} 34. Ra2 {6} Bc5 {601} 35. Bxc5+ {84} bxc5 {5} 36.
Rxa7 {6} Ba8 {247} 37. Ra5 {92} Rb8 {166} 38. Rxc5 {133} Rxb3 {2} 39. Nxd5 {165
} Bxd5 {5} 40. Bxd5 {6} Nxd5 {5} 41. Rc8+ {13} Ke7 {4} 42. Rxd5 {4} Rbf3 {118}
43. Rd2 {29} Kf6 {273} 44. Rc6+ {16} Kg5 {5} 45. Rd5+ {202} R3f5 {161} 46. h4+
{98} Kh5 {5} 47. Rxf5+ {33} Rxf5 {2} 48. Kg2 {6} g5 {116} 49. hxg5 {35} hxg5 {
75} 50. f3 {63} g4 {3} 51. f4 {19} Ra5 {16} 52. Rc8 {39} Ra2+ {103} 53. Kf1 {30
} Ra1+ {184} 54. Ke2 {16} Ra2+ {3} 55. Kd1 {45} Rg2 {125} 56. Rh8+ {18} Kg6 {0}
57. Rg8+ {4} Kf5 {18} 58. Rg5+ {4} Ke4 {14} 59. Rxg4 {3} Ra2 {73} 60. Rg5 {63}
Rf2 {39} 61. Ke1 {51} Ra2 {25} 62. Rb5 {69} Kf3 {11} 63. Rg5 {27} Ke3 {18} 64.
Kd1 {29} Ke4 {17} 65. Rg8 {12} Rg2 {18} 66. Ke1 {12} Ra2 {6} 67. Kf1 {9} Kf3 {
14} 68. Kg1 {22} Ke4 {29} 69. Rg6 {65} Rb2 {17} 70. Kf1 {32} Ra2 {10} 71. Rg5 {
8} Kf3 {29} 72. Ke1 {3} Ke4 {8} 73. f5 {70} Ra5 {22} 74. g4 {75} Ke3 {3} 75.
Kd1 {11} 1/2-1/2

 

Aradhya Garg (2287)

Cuban GM Lazaro Batista Bruzon, the fourth highest-rated player in the tournament, was lucky to escape with a draw against 16-year-old Indian talent, Aradhya Garg, in the first round. Bruzon, who employed the King’s Indian Defence, won a pawn on the 33rd move, but his untitled opponent had a firm grip of the dark squares around Bruzon’s king as compensation.

 

On move 36, Garg (white) missed an opportunity to intensify his attack and the game ended abruptly five moves later by perpetual check.
[Event "18th DUBAI OPEN CHESS Tournament 2016"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2016.04.11"]
[Round "1.4"]
[White "Aradhya, Garg"]
[Black "Bruzon Batista, Lazaro"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "E62"]
[WhiteElo "2287"]
[BlackElo "2679"]
[PlyCount "81"]
[EventDate "2016.??.??"]
[TimeControl "5400+30"]
1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. g3 Bg7 4. Bg2 O-O 5. Nc3 d6 6. Nf3 c6 7. O-O Bf5 8. b3
Ne4 9. Bb2 Nxc3 10. Bxc3 Be4 11. Qc1 e6 12. Qe3 d5 13. Bh3 h5 14. Rac1 Re8 15.
Nd2 Bf5 16. Bxf5 exf5 17. Qf3 Na6 18. e3 Nc7 19. cxd5 Nxd5 20. Nc4 Re6 21. Nb2
Bf8 22. Nd3 Bd6 23. Kh1 Qe8 24. Nc5 Re7 25. Rfe1 Rd8 26. Bd2 Nf6 27. Kg2 Bxc5
28. Rxc5 Ne4 29. Rc2 c5 30. Bc1 Ng5 31. Qf4 Ne6 32. Qh4 cxd4 33. exd4 Rxd4 34.
Qf6 Rd6 35. Kf1 Qb5+ 36. Kg1 $2 (36. Rc4 $3 Re8 37. Bb2 Nd4 38. Qxd6 Rxe1+ 39.
Kxe1 $4 (39. Kg2 $1 Nc6 40. a4 Qxb3 (40... Qb6 41. Qb8+ Qd8 42. Qxd8+ Nxd8 43.
Rc8 Re8 44. Bf6 $18) 41. Qb8+ $3) 39... Qe8+ 40. Kf1 Qe2+ $11) 36... Re8 37.
Bb2 Nd4 38. Rxe8+ Qxe8 39. Qxd6 Qe1+ 40. Kg2 Qe4+ 41. Kh3 1/2-1/2

 

Eighth-seed GM Igor Kovalenko failed to convert his chances in the first round during the middle game as he was likewise held to a draw by India’s Al Muthaiah. However, his real problems were in the third round...

... against young IM Aryan Chopra (2447), who had earlier scared Sargissian to a draw. This time, he managed to beat Kovalenko, who just blundered!
[Event "18th DUBAI OPEN CHESS Tournament 2016"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2016.04.13"]
[Round "3.21"]
[White "Aryan Chopra"]
[Black "Kovalenko, Igor"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C92"]
[WhiteElo "2447"]
[BlackElo "2662"]
[PlyCount "155"]
[EventDate "2016.??.??"]
[TimeControl "5400+30"]
[WhiteClock "0:03:11"]
[BlackClock "0:10:43"]
1. e4 {0} e5 {0} 2. Nf3 {0} Nc6 {0} 3. Bb5 {0} a6 {0} 4. Ba4 {0} Nf6 {1} 5. O-O
{4} Be7 {6} 6. Re1 {19} b5 {3} 7. Bb3 {5} d6 {1} 8. c3 {23} O-O {4} 9. h3 {21}
Bb7 {8} 10. d4 {24} Re8 {11} 11. Ng5 {220} Rf8 {5} 12. Nf3 {7} Qd7 {3} 13. Nbd2
{36} h6 {37} 14. a3 {109} Rfd8 {513} 15. Bc2 {136} Bf8 {214} 16. Nf1 {549} Qe8
{53} 17. Ng3 {477} Ne7 {359} 18. Nh4 {372} c5 {877} 19. Nhf5 {402} Nxf5 {308}
20. Nxf5 {23} Kh7 {1317} 21. Qf3 {931} Ng8 {4} 22. dxe5 {558} dxe5 {5} 23. b3 {
50} g6 {202} 24. Ne3 {17} Bg7 {4} 25. c4 {90} Ne7 {452} 26. Nd5 {57} Qf8 {90}
27. Bb2 {330} Nc6 {43} 28. Bd3 {262} Nd4 {598} 29. Bxd4 {36} cxd4 {2} 30. Qe2 {
16} Qd6 {89} 31. a4 {145} bxc4 {7} 32. bxc4 {50} a5 {20} 33. Rec1 {134} Qc5 {55
} 34. Qb2 {461} Bc6 {14} 35. Rcb1 {9} Bf8 {50} 36. Qb6 {77} Rac8 {67} 37. Kf1 {
195} Bd6 {9} 38. Ke2 {82} Kg7 {60} 39. g4 {106} Rb8 {94} 40. Qxc5 {8} Bxc5 {3}
41. Bc2 {72} Rh8 {45} 42. h4 {72} Bd7 {49} 43. f3 {27} Rhc8 {41} 44. Kd3 {44}
Bc6 {33} 45. Ke2 {59} Kf8 {166} 46. Kd3 {40} Ke8 {80} 47. Rxb8 {64} Rxb8 48.
Nc7+ {6} Ke7 {319} 49. Na6 {7} Ba7 {3} 50. Nxb8 {11} Bxb8 {1} 51. c5 {198} Ba7
{22} 52. Kc4 {17} Bb8 {34} 53. Rb1 {36} Bc7 {3} 54. g5 {86} hxg5 {26} 55. hxg5
{5} Bd8 {147} 56. f4 {55} exf4 {3} 57. Kxd4 {9} Ke8 {35} 58. Rg1 {113} Be7 {8}
59. Rg4 {32} f3 {25} 60. Rf4 {8} Bxg5 {12} 61. Rxf3 {2} Ke7 {70} 62. Rb3 {43}
Kd7 {69} 63. Bd3 {57} Bxa4 {42} 64. Rb7+ {44} Ke8 {24} 65. Kd5 {22} Bd7 {61}
66. Bb5 {39} Bxb5 {3} 67. Rxb5 {6} f6 {66} 68. c6 {75} Kd8 {4} 69. Rxa5 {11}
Bf4 {32} 70. Ra8+ {23} Kc7 {5} 71. Ra7+ {4} Kc8 {3} 72. Rf7 {108} Be5 {7} 73.
c7 {71} Kb7 {21} 74. Ke6 {7} g5 {8} 75. Kd7 {14} Bxc7 {3} 76. Rxf6 {4} g4 {6}
77. Rg6 {12} g3 {3} 78. Ke6 {5} 1-0

Sixth-seed Baadur Jobava of Georgia outplayed Indian WGM Bhakti Kulkarni in the first round [Photo: Sarin Abdulsalam]

In the second round, he was paired with the Indian version of himself, IM Rathnakaran K., whose queen sacrifice for a rook and minor piece proved insufficient against the three-time champion of Georgia. [Photo: Sarin Abdulsalam]

India was third time lucky! Facing his third consecutive Indian opponent, second consecutive Keralite, Jobava finally fell! [Photo: Sarin Abdulsalam]

The 33rd-seed GM G.N. Gopal scored the third round’s biggest upset when took down sixth-seeded Georgian GM Baadur Jobava in an electrifying tactical slugfest. Jobava, playing the Pirc Defence, threw down the gauntlet when he allowed Gopal to capture his g6-pawn with a knight, unleashing a maelstrom of complications that was impossible to navigate over the board.

 

When the dust cleared, Gopal had given up two minor pieces for a rook and two pawns, but more importantly, black’s lack of coordination and severely weakened kingside allowed Gopal to launch a second wave of attack and force resignation on the 48th move.

[Event "18th DUBAI OPEN CHESS Tournament 2016"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2016.04.13"]
[Round "3.2"]
[White "Gopal G.N."]
[Black "Jobava, Baadur"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C41"]
[WhiteElo "2544"]
[BlackElo "2672"]
[PlyCount "95"]
[EventDate "2016.??.??"]
[TimeControl "5400+30"]
[WhiteClock "0:00:46"]
[BlackClock "0:02:03"]
1. e4 {0} d6 {129} 2. d4 {0} Nf6 {7} 3. Nc3 {0} e5 {18} 4. Nf3 {0} Nbd7 {9} 5.
Bc4 {2} Be7 {9} 6. a4 {20} O-O {18} 7. O-O {6} a5 {43} 8. Re1 {484} h6 {96} 9.
h3 {29} Re8 {18} 10. Be3 {256} Bf8 {223} 11. Ba2 {419} b6 {233} 12. Nh4 {1190}
Bb7 {51} 13. Nf5 {97} exd4 {1009} 14. Bxd4 {308} Ne5 {2142} 15. Qd2 {1185} Nfd7
{308} 16. f4 {396} Nc6 {7} 17. Bf2 {177} Nb4 {56} 18. Bc4 {391} g6 {469} 19.
Nh4 {261} Bg7 {157} 20. Rad1 {611} Nc5 {353} 21. Nxg6 {131} d5 {351} 22. Bh4 {3
} Qd6 {265} 23. Ne7+ {22} Rxe7 {4} 24. Bxe7 {35} Qxe7 {4} 25. Nxd5 {3} Nxd5 {6}
26. Bxd5 {6} c6 {77} 27. Ba2 {62} Nxa4 {96} 28. c3 {39} Nc5 {11} 29. e5 {39}
Ba6 {41} 30. Qe3 {73} a4 {58} 31. f5 {44} Qg5 {3} 32. e6 {30} fxe6 {23} 33.
fxe6 {7} Qxe3+ {40} 34. Rxe3 {1} Nb3 {12} 35. Rd7 {34} Bf6 {12} 36. Rg3+ {27}
Bg5 {37} 37. h4 {28} Bc4 {4} 38. hxg5 {74} Bxe6 {3} 39. gxh6+ {1} Kh8 {4} 40.
Re7 {13} Bf5 {4} 41. Rf3 {14} Bc2 {51} 42. Rf6 {5} Nc1 {57} 43. Be6 {12} a3 {39
} 44. bxa3 {37} Ne2+ {3} 45. Kh2 {24} Nxc3 {3} 46. Rb7 {110} Ne4 {14} 47. Rf4 {
52} b5 {110} 48. Bf5 {36} 1-0

Here is a video by Dr. Sarin Abdulsalam where Gopal explains his game

GM Aravindh Chithambaram (2515) held compatriot GM Adhiban to a draw in the third round

GM Shardul Gagare (2491) held Azeri GM Eltaj Safarli (2656) in the third round

Also interesting was the third round game between UAE's national coach GM Ivan Sokolov (2626)...

...and Indian GM Deepan Chakkravarthy (2466)

Sokolov, playing black against Deepan’s Giuoco Piano was locked in a complicated encounter with four minor pieces and a rook on each side. After sacrificing a pawn for the initiative, Sokolov managed to create a dangerous passer on the d-file. Feeling the pressure, the Indian finally tripped up on the 35th move, allowing Sokolov to win the exchange, which he handily converted after 45 moves.

[Event "18th DUBAI OPEN CHESS Tournament 2016"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2016.04.13"]
[Round "3.9"]
[White "Deepan Chakkravarthy J."]
[Black "Sokolov, Ivan"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C50"]
[WhiteElo "2466"]
[BlackElo "2626"]
[PlyCount "89"]
[EventDate "2016.??.??"]
[TimeControl "5400+30"]
[WhiteClock "0:01:48"]
[BlackClock "0:05:25"]
1. e4 {0} e5 {374} 2. Nf3 {0} Nc6 {3} 3. Bc4 {8} Bc5 {29} 4. O-O {53} Nf6 {23}
5. d3 {15} O-O {30} 6. c3 {40} d5 {99} 7. exd5 {180} Nxd5 {57} 8. h3 {1015} Nb6
{127} 9. Bb5 {169} Bd6 {20} 10. Re1 {80} Ne7 {5} 11. d4 {442} exd4 {29} 12.
cxd4 {325} Bf5 {698} 13. Nc3 {95} c6 {717} 14. Bf1 {373} Ned5 {123} 15. Bg5 {
156} Qc7 {607} 16. Rc1 {329} Nxc3 {37} 17. bxc3 {80} h6 {354} 18. Bd2 {154}
Rfe8 {66} 19. Qb3 {408} c5 {396} 20. c4 {69} Nd7 {172} 21. d5 {467} Be4 {4} 22.
g3 {650} b5 {530} 23. cxb5 {95} Nf6 {2} 24. Nh4 {172} Bxd5 {147} 25. Bc4 {13}
Bb7 {2} 26. Nf5 {185} Bf8 {184} 27. Bf4 {297} Qd7 {112} 28. g4 {14} Rxe1+ {219}
29. Rxe1 {1} Rd8 {14} 30. Ne3 {211} Qd4 {305} 31. Bxf7+ {98} Kh8 {1} 32. Qc4 {
28} Ne4 {281} 33. Qxd4 {57} cxd4 {1} 34. Nc4 {30} d3 {271} 35. Bd2 {106} Bc5 {
24} 36. Bg6 {34} Bxf2+ {16} 37. Kf1 {22} Bxe1 {9} 38. Kxe1 {4} Rc8 {159} 39.
Bxe4 {57} Bxe4 {2} 40. Nd6 {18} Rc7 {1} 41. Kf2 {24} Bg6 {16} 42. Ke3 {11} Re7+
{108} 43. Kd4 {6} Rd7 {3} 44. Kc5 {21} Rc7+ {18} 45. Kd4 0-1

 

GM Sandipan Chanda landed in an interesting position against Greek WGM marina Makropolou (2176)

White just captured the black pawn on f5. How will you respond?

11-year-old FM Nihal Sarin had a forgettable outing in the third round against Bangladeshi GM Al Rakib (2492)

However, a round before, he fought tooth and nail in an epic Sicilian against Turksish GM Kivanc Hanedaroglu (2473), who later drew with Cheparinov
[Event "18th DUBAI OPEN CHESS Tournament 2016"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2016.04.12"]
[Round "2.37"]
[White "Haznedaroglu, Kivanc"]
[Black "Nihal Sarin"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[ECO "B96"]
[WhiteElo "2473"]
[BlackElo "2351"]
[PlyCount "129"]
[EventDate "2016.??.??"]
[TimeControl "5400+30"]
[WhiteClock "0:00:42"]
[BlackClock "0:01:17"]
1. e4 {0} c5 {61} 2. Nf3 {0} d6 {5} 3. d4 {0} Nf6 {10} 4. Nc3 {59} cxd4 {7} 5.
Nxd4 {5} a6 {7} 6. Bg5 {15} e6 {7} 7. f4 {74} Nbd7 {8} 8. Qe2 {38} Qc7 {200} 9.
O-O-O {121} Be7 {14} 10. g4 {155} b5 {930} 11. a3 {403} O-O {147} 12. Bg2 {554}
Bb7 {305} 13. h4 {212} Rab8 {2034} 14. Rhe1 {694} Rfc8 {613} 15. Bxf6 {730}
Bxf6 {250} 16. g5 {9} Be7 {196} 17. f5 {163} e5 {72} 18. Nb3 {22} f6 {73} 19.
Bh3 {587} Nc5 {551} 20. Kb1 {115} Qb6 {143} 21. Nd5 {273} Bxd5 {8} 22. Rxd5 {5}
Nxb3 {190} 23. cxb3 {7} Rc5 {29} 24. Qd2 {48} Rbc8 {203} 25. gxf6 {47} Bxf6 {3}
26. Rxd6 {57} Qc7 {20} 27. Rd1 {194} Rc6 {90} 28. Qd5+ {93} Kh8 {6} 29. Rd7 {18
} Rc1+ {40} 30. Ka2 {10} Rxd1 {7} 31. Rxc7 {486} Rxd5 {8} 32. Rxc8+ {4} Rd8 {6}
33. Rc6 {56} Bxh4 {22} 34. Rxa6 {5} h5 {57} 35. Rb6 {144} Rd2 {67} 36. Rxb5 {
372} Bf2 {7} 37. Rb8+ {3} Kh7 {7} 38. b4 {2} Bd4 {13} 39. a4 {178} Rxb2+ {14}
40. Ka3 {0} Rf2 {11} 41. f6 {5} Rxf6 {80} 42. Bd7 {17} Rf3+ {65} 43. Ka2 {6} h4
{25} 44. Rc8 {74} h3 {32} 45. Rc1 {330} h2 {10} 46. Rh1 {1} Bg1 {15} 47. b5 {4}
Rd3 {8} 48. Bc8 {44} Rc3 {117} 49. Be6 {15} Kg6 {12} 50. b6 {192} Rc2+ {59} 51.
Kb3 {154} Rc6 {8} 52. a5 {8} Rxe6 {50} 53. b7 {5} Ba7 {30} 54. Rxh2 {52} Re7 {
12} 55. a6 {5} Re6 {5} 56. Ra2 {36} Kf6 {25} 57. Kc4 {19} g5 {56} 58. Kd5 {29}
Rb6 {48} 59. Rh2 {19} Kg7 {22} 60. Ra2 {64} g4 {44} 61. Kxe5 {22} g3 {14} 62.
Kf4 {15} Rg6 {32} 63. Kf3 {27} Kf7 {17} 64. Kg2 {34} Ke7 {16} 65. e5 {173}
1/2-1/2

GM Salem A. R. Saleh (2615) of the UAE

Reigning Asian champion GM Salem A. R. Saleh of the UAE, seeded 18th in the tournament, played an inspired tactical game against India’s Gusain Himal, sacrificing his rook on the 15th move to open up the position. The Indian gave up his bishop to derail the attack, but Saleh’s dominating bishop on the d5-square was a menace that anchored the win in 56 moves.

[Event "18th DUBAI OPEN CHESS Tournament 2016"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2016.04.12"]
[Round "2.15"]
[White "Salem, A.R. Saleh"]
[Black "Gusain, Himal"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "D30"]
[WhiteElo "2621"]
[BlackElo "2429"]
[PlyCount "111"]
[EventDate "2016.??.??"]
[TimeControl "5400+30"]
[WhiteClock "0:05:14"]
[BlackClock "0:06:41"]
1. d4 {132} d5 {0} 2. c4 {4} e6 {0} 3. Nf3 {5} c6 {0} 4. g3 {11} dxc4 {38} 5.
Bg2 {7} b5 {9} 6. O-O {22} Bb7 {188} 7. b3 {35} cxb3 {10} 8. Qxb3 {10} Nf6 {87}
9. Nc3 {169} a5 {553} 10. Ne5 {719} a4 {228} 11. Qc2 {55} Nd5 {1156} 12. Nxd5 {
368} cxd5 {130} 13. Rb1 {29} Nd7 {206} 14. Rxb5 {385} Ba6 {8} 15. Rxd5 {373}
exd5 {30} 16. Qc6 {22} Rc8 {1384} 17. Qxa6 {258} Nxe5 {418} 18. dxe5 {12} Bc5 {
11} 19. Bxd5 {924} O-O {34} 20. e4 {3} Kh8 {329} 21. Qxa4 {218} Qb6 {298} 22.
Bf4 {183} Bd4 {98} 23. Qa3 {331} Rce8 {241} 24. Kg2 {110} Kg8 {244} 25. Qd6 {
583} Qb2 {15} 26. Qd7 {246} Rd8 {63} 27. Bxf7+ {230} Kh8 {6} 28. Qf5 {21} Bxe5
{252} 29. Bxe5 {230} Qb7 {7} 30. Bxg7+ {112} Kxg7 {7} 31. Bd5 {1} Qc7 {27} 32.
Qg5+ {27} Kh8 {19} 33. Rc1 {14} Qb8 {37} 34. Rb1 {121} Qd6 {34} 35. Rb7 {42}
Rd7 {8} 36. Rxd7 {113} Qxd7 {7} 37. a4 {76} Qd6 {12} 38. a5 {18} h6 {8} 39. Qe3
{2} Kh7 {11} 40. Qa7+ {13} Kg6 {57} 41. Qb6 {67} Rf6 {7} 42. Qxd6 {11} Rxd6 {7}
43. Bb7 {2} Rd3 {9} 44. a6 {8} Ra3 {6} 45. f4 {14} Kf6 {28} 46. g4 {14} Ke6 {8}
47. e5 {77} h5 {14} 48. h3 {116} h4 {10} 49. Kf2 {8} Ra5 {82} 50. Ke3 {15} Kd7
{8} 51. Ke4 {107} Kc7 {13} 52. Kf5 {7} Ra3 {31} 53. e6 {21} Rxh3 {47} 54. e7 {
34} Re3 {11} 55. Be4 {12} Kd7 {98} 56. a7 {19} 1-0

IM CRG Krishna (2404) has suffered a poor start and is on 1.0/3

 And so has FM V Ap Karthik (2485) who lost to Turkish GM Emre Can (2473) in the second round...

 ...and veteran WIM Bhagyashree Thipsay in the third round. Old is still gold!

Ranking after Round 03:

Rk. SNo     Name FED Rtg Pts.  TB1   TB2   TB3   TB4 
1 10   GM Akopian Vladimir ARM 2656 3,0 0,0 4,0 4,0 3,0
  33   GM Gopal G.N. IND 2544 3,0 0,0 4,0 4,0 3,0
3 5   GM Howell David W L ENG 2678 3,0 0,0 4,0 3,0 3,0
  16   GM Sokolov Ivan NED 2626 3,0 0,0 4,0 3,0 3,0
  21   GM Anton Guijarro David ESP 2616 3,0 0,0 4,0 3,0 3,0
  25   GM Yilmaz Mustafa TUR 2594 3,0 0,0 4,0 3,0 3,0
7 23   GM Savchenko Boris RUS 2607 3,0 0,0 3,5 3,0 3,0
8 13   GM Jones Gawain C B ENG 2650 3,0 0,0 3,5 2,0 3,0
9 53   GM Mammadov Zaur AZE 2456 3,0 0,0 3,0 1,5 3,0
10 7   GM Adhiban B. IND 2663 2,5 0,0 4,5 4,0 2,0

Watch the Round 04 games LIVE here!

Links:

Pairings for Round 04

Photos provided by Dubai Chess and Cultural Club unless mentioned