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Chess as an Art by GM Sundararajan Kidambi (2/2)

by Sundararajan Kidambi - 17/03/2017

Part one of "Chess as an Art" by Sundararajan Kidambi was received with great enthusiasm by all our readers. Many wrote to us saying that the material was high quality and they learnt a lot from it. In the second part, Kidambi shows you two games by Fischer and Karpov that greatly resemble the ideas used by Wesley So in his game against Granda Zuniga. Going over these games will consolidate your knowledge of the themes and make it easier for you to use it in your games.

A short Recap

In the first part of this article we saw the game between Wesley So and Granda Zuniga. The move ...g5 was extremely impressive.

A unique way to save the d4 pawn. If White takes on d4, Black will attack the other knight with his pawn either by ...a4 or ...g4.

The move ...Re5! was also very strong as it controlled the important fifth rank. All in all it was excellent play by Wesley.

From a search on Mega-Database 2017 you realize that the move ...g5 (shown in the first diagram) was played between Markov and Frolyanov before Wesley had tried it. We asked So (via email) whether he had seen the move. To which he replied that he had seen a similar motif in his preparation but not the exact move in the exact position.

 

This once again brings us to an important point that strong players know their patterns very well. And this helps them to execute moves like ...g5 and ....Re5 with ease. Let's have a look at some games selected by Kidambi which have similar themes to what Wesley So used against Granda Zuniga.

 

Read part I of the article

Chess as an Art by GM Sundararajan Kidambi - Part II

[Event "Western op-ch"]
[Site "Bay City"]
[Date "1963.07.07"]
[Round "8"]
[White "Berliner, Hans Jack"]
[Black "Fischer, Robert James"]
[Result "*"]
[ECO "D41"]
[PlyCount "39"]
[EventDate "1963.07.04"]
[EventType "swiss"]
[EventRounds "8"]
[EventCountry "USA"]
[SourceTitle "Fischer"]
[Source "ChessBase"]
[SourceDate "1999.07.01"]
[SourceVersion "1"]
[SourceVersionDate "1999.07.01"]
[SourceQuality "1"]
1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. e4 Nxc3 6. bxc3 c5 7. Nf3 cxd4 8.
cxd4 Bb4+ 9. Bd2 Bxd2+ 10. Qxd2 O-O 11. Bd3 b6 12. O-O Bb7 13. Rfd1 Nc6 14. Qb2
Qf6 15. Rac1 Rfd8 16. Bb5 Rac8 17. Ne5 Nxe5 18. dxe5 Qf4 19. Rxc8 Rxc8 20. Qd4
*

What should Black play?

Fischer came up with the excellent move 20...g5!!

 

Geller once said that Fischer doesn't devise deep plans, but leaps from position to position. I am not too sure if he meant it as a compliment, but it can clearly be seen that Bobby was way ahead of his time and he was the forerunner of so called modern chess (I don't like to call it computer style!). In this position he clears the back rank, isolates the pawn on e5 by preventing a future f2-f4 and also prepares a possible opening up of the g-file when White plays f3 to support the pawn on e4.

 

Looking back at Granda-So game, I felt that So too leapt from position to position. First he would have visualised until g5-g4, and once he arrived at that position he then he leapt on too Re5-b5 idea.

 


Back to the current game. Here too Bobby probably devised the idea of opening the g-file and once having reached the position devised new ideas from there.

[Event "Western op-ch"]
[Site "Bay City"]
[Date "1963.07.07"]
[Round "8"]
[White "Berliner, Hans Jack"]
[Black "Fischer, Robert James"]
[Result "*"]
[ECO "D41"]
[SetUp "1"]
[FEN "2r3k1/pb3ppp/1p2p3/1B2P3/3QPq2/8/P4PPP/3R2K1 b - - 0 20"]
[PlyCount "7"]
[EventDate "1963.07.04"]
[EventType "swiss"]
[EventRounds "8"]
[EventCountry "USA"]
[SourceTitle "Fischer"]
[Source "ChessBase"]
[SourceDate "1999.07.01"]
[SourceVersion "1"]
[SourceVersionDate "1999.07.01"]
[SourceQuality "1"]
{[#]} 20... g5 21. f3 g4 22. Be2 gxf3 23. gxf3 Kh8 *

What a transformation! And such courage to play a pawn move in front of his own king for specific purposeful play. Comparing this position to the Granda-So game , although the position is completely different, there is a similarity in So's decision to play g5 for specific purposes and disregarding the seeming weakness of his own king side by understanding that his opponent cannot make use of it at all .Rest of the game is pretty instructive and would warrant careful study too, but it is not relevant to the comparison with the main game. I refrain from any more comments but encourage the reader to play through the game anyway!

[Event "Western op-ch"]
[Site "Bay City"]
[Date "1963.07.07"]
[Round "8"]
[White "Berliner, Hans Jack"]
[Black "Fischer, Robert James"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "D41"]
[SetUp "1"]
[FEN "2r4k/pb3p1p/1p2p3/4P3/3QPq2/5P2/P3B2P/3R2K1 w - - 0 24"]
[PlyCount "60"]
[EventDate "1963.07.04"]
[EventType "swiss"]
[EventRounds "8"]
[EventCountry "USA"]
[SourceTitle "Fischer"]
[Source "ChessBase"]
[SourceDate "1999.07.01"]
[SourceVersion "1"]
[SourceVersionDate "1999.07.01"]
[SourceQuality "1"]
{[#]} 24. Kh1 Ba6 25. Qf2 Bxe2 26. Qxe2 Qxe5 27. Rg1 f5 28. Qd3 fxe4 29. fxe4
Rf8 30. Qc2 Qf6 31. Rg2 Qd4 32. h3 Qa1+ 33. Rg1 Qe5 34. Qg2 b5 35. Qc2 b4 36.
Qg2 a5 37. Qc2 Qf6 38. Qc4 Qf3+ 39. Kh2 Rd8 40. Qc2 Qc3 41. Qxc3+ bxc3 42. Rc1
Rd3 43. Rb1 Kg7 44. Rb5 a4 45. Rc5 a3 46. Kg2 Re3 47. Rc4 Kf6 48. h4 Ke5 49.
Kf2 Rh3 50. Kg2 Rd3 51. h5 Kf4 52. h6 Ke3 53. Rc7 Kd2 0-1

 

Karpov-Hort Alekhine Memorial 1971

In a recent interview to New In Chess, So Wesley has mentioned that under the tutelage of Tukmakov he has spent some time studying the classical games of Karpov and Kasparov! I hope I will not be off target to believe that his Rook manoeuvres were inspired by this yesteryear Karpov Classic!

[Event "Alekhine Memorial"]
[Site "Moscow"]
[Date "1971.12.08"]
[Round "11"]
[White "Karpov, Anatoly"]
[Black "Hort, Vlastimil"]
[Result "*"]
[ECO "B81"]
[WhiteElo "2540"]
[BlackElo "2605"]
[PlyCount "42"]
[EventDate "1971.11.24"]
[EventType "tourn"]
[EventRounds "17"]
[EventCountry "URS"]
[EventCategory "14"]
[SourceTitle "MCL"]
[Source "ChessBase"]
[SourceDate "1999.07.01"]
[SourceVersion "1"]
[SourceVersionDate "1999.07.01"]
[SourceQuality "1"]
1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 e6 6. g4 Nc6 7. g5 Nd7 8. Be3
a6 9. f4 Be7 10. Rg1 Nxd4 11. Qxd4 e5 12. Qd2 exf4 13. Bxf4 Ne5 14. Be2 Be6 15.
Nd5 Bxd5 16. exd5 Ng6 17. Be3 h6 18. gxh6 Bh4+ 19. Kd1 gxh6 20. Bxh6 Bf6 21. c3
Be5 *

 

White is a pawn up, but Black has a strong bishop on e5. What should White do?

22.Rg4!

This is a famous game of Karpov's of which numerous commentaries have been written including by Dvoretsky and Kotov. Note the striking similarity in the emptiness of the fourth rank and white's space advantage with the pawn on d5, compared to Granda-So 2016. Karpov's Rook shuttles on the 4th rank back and forth and later drops back to the third rank and singlehandedly wins him the game. Another game which would be worth careful study!

[Event "Alekhine Memorial"]
[Site "Moscow"]
[Date "1971.12.08"]
[Round "11"]
[White "Karpov, Anatoly"]
[Black "Hort, Vlastimil"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B81"]
[WhiteElo "2540"]
[BlackElo "2605"]
[SetUp "1"]
[FEN "r2qk2r/1p3p2/p2p2nB/3Pb3/8/2P5/PP1QB2P/R2K2R1 w kq - 0 22"]
[PlyCount "23"]
[EventDate "1971.11.24"]
[EventType "tourn"]
[EventRounds "17"]
[EventCountry "URS"]
[EventCategory "14"]
[SourceTitle "MCL"]
[Source "ChessBase"]
[SourceDate "1999.07.01"]
[SourceVersion "1"]
[SourceVersionDate "1999.07.01"]
[SourceQuality "1"]
{[#]} 22. Rg4 Qf6 23. h4 Qf5 24. Rb4 Bf6 25. h5 Ne7 26. Rf4 Qe5 27. Rf3 Nxd5
28. Rd3 Rxh6 29. Rxd5 Qe4 30. Rd3 Qh1+ 31. Kc2 Qxa1 32. Qxh6 Be5 33. Qg5 1-0

Three superb games filled with pure art! The great man Tarrasch was right when he said that chess has the power to make man happy.

 

Not only playing, but also replaying and going through such gems can keep elevating us to higher and higher moods.And appreciation of such an art only improves with the passage time, just like old wine!


I sign off with contentment, in the hope that I have given the readers something to cherish for a long time to come in the quiet of their study!

GM Sundararajan Kidambi is considered by many Indian players as the one with impeccable knowledge of chess classics

ChessBase India congratulates GM Sundararajan Kidambi for launching a new blog "Musings on Chess". Knowing what an encyclopaedic knowledge that the grandmaster from Chennai possesses, I think we are in for a treat! One can only hope that Kidambi keeps writing regularly! We will keep reminding him about it!  

 

When we contacted Sundararajan, he told us that it was because of his mentor Srikanth Govindaseshan that he decided to write the first blogpost. Says Kidambi, "He has been asking me to blog for years now! I hope I will be able to sustain the motivation to write regularly."

 

Visit Kidambi's recently launched blog

Postscript

When the part one of Kidambi's article was published, we received a comment from an experienced trainer in Chennai Ganesh Dorairaj, who said that Wesley's rook manoeuvre greatly resembled the idea executed by Lasker against Tarrasch in their World Championship Match in 1908. We agree with Ganesh and present to you first a position to solve and then the entire game annotated by none other than the great Garry Kasparov.

In the same spirit as Wesley and Karpov, what do you think Lasker played over here?
[Event "World-ch08 Lasker-Tarrasch +8-3=5"]
[Site "Duesseldorf & Munich"]
[Date "1908.08.24"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Tarrasch, Siegbert"]
[Black "Lasker, Emanuel"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C66"]
[Annotator "Kasparov,G"]
[PlyCount "82"]
[EventDate "1908.08.17"]
[EventType "match"]
[EventRounds "16"]
[EventCountry "GER"]
[SourceTitle "MainBase"]
[Source "ChessBase"]
[SourceDate "1999.07.01"]
[SourceVersion "2"]
[SourceVersionDate "1999.07.01"]
[SourceQuality "1"]
1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. O-O d6 5. d4 Bd7 6. Nc3 Be7 7. Re1 exd4 8.
Nxd4 Nxd4 9. Qxd4 Bxb5 10. Nxb5 O-O 11. Bg5 h6 12. Bh4 Re8 13. Rad1 Nd7 14.
Bxe7 Rxe7 15. Qc3 {[#] I think Tarrasch was quite happy with the opening
results: White has a small but constant advantage, and there are chances to
increase it without any risk. One would guess that Tarrasch expected something
like 15...Nf8 and planned 16.Nd4 with growing pressure. Lasker knew that his
best chance to avoid a long, maybe painful defence was to take Tarrasch out of
his confident mood by doing something very provocative (on the chess board, of
course!). And so he moves his rook contrary to all rules of conventional
wisdom: Ich glaube, daß Tarrasch mit dem Ergebnis aus der Eröffnung recht
zufrieden gewesen ist: Weiß hat einen kleinen, aber anhaltenden Vorteil, und
es gibt Möglichkeiten, diesen Vorteil ohne Risiko zu vergrößern. Man kann
vermuten, daß Tarrasch vielleicht einen Zug wie 15...Sf8 erwartete, wonach er
16.Sd4 mit wachsendem Druck geplant haben dürfte. Lasker wußte indes, daß der
beste Weg, eine lange, qualvolle Verteidigung zu vermeiden, darin bestand, den
Gegner aus seiner zufriedenen Stimmung herauszureißen. Das tat er mit einem
provokativen Zug (auf dem Brett natürlich!), der wider jede schachliche
Vernunft zu gehen schien:} Re5 16. Nd4 Rc5 {From a pure chess point of view
this idea is quite suspicious. The misplaced rook could cause Black
considerable problems. But the goal was to make Tarrasch lose his composure in
face of the impudent rook. Aus rein schachlichen Gesichtspunkten ist diese
Idee sehr verdächtig: der schlecht postierte Turm kann Schwarz etliche
Probleme bereiten. Aber das Ziel war, daß Tarrasch angesichts dieses frechen
Turmes aus der Fassung kommen sollte.} 17. Qb3 Nb6 18. f4 {Now there is no way
back, but Lasker has no intention of withdrawing his advanced rook. Jetzt gibt
es kein Zurück mehr, aber Lasker hatte ohnehin nie die Absicht, den
vorgerückten Turm zurückzubeordern.} Qf6 19. Qf3 Re8 20. c3 (20. b3 {and c2-c4
was more precise. nebst c2-c4 war genauer.}) 20... a5 {Trying to weaken
White's queen side. Damit versucht er, den weißen Damenflügel zu schwächen.}
21. b3 a4 22. b4 $6 (22. c4 $1 {would have left the black rook on c5
temporarily unemployed, although after hätte den schwarzen Turm auf c5 für
eine Weile arbeitslos gemacht. Allerdings mußte Weiß, um nach} axb3 23. axb3 c6
{in order to make any real progress White had to choose the very dynamic
irgendwelche Fortschritte zu erzielen, das äußerst dynamische} 24. Nf5 d5 25.
Qf2 Nd7 26. g4 $1 {spielen.}) 22... Rc4 {Now the rook has no more moves, but
the pressure on c3 is a full-time job! Nun hat der Turm wirklich keine Züge
mehr, aber der Druck auf c3 ist für ihn eine volle Beschäftigung.} 23. g3 Rd8 (
23... c5 {was premature because of wäre wegen} 24. Nb5 {voreilig gewesen.}) 24.
Re3 (24. a3 $1 {was the best prophylactic against the intended c7-c5. war die
beste Prophylaxe gegen den beabsichtigten Zug c7-c5.}) 24... c5 25. Nb5 $2 {
Tarrasch is out of his mind. Tarrasch ist von Sinnen!} (25. bxc5 Rxc5 26. Rb1
Nc4 27. Rd3 {led to an equal position. But in his desperate desire to punish
his opponent for breaking the general rules of chess Tarrasch believed he
could execute a miraculous combination. führte zu einer ausgeglichenen
Stellung. Aber der brennende Wunsch, den Gegner für die Verletzung der
allgemeinen Schachprinzipien zu bestrafen, läßt Tarrasch an eine magische
Kombination glauben.}) 25... cxb4 26. Rxd6 Rxd6 27. e5 {[#]} Rxf4 $1 {The
miracle was in fact a mirage, and the greatest irony is that the killing punch
comes from the infamous rook. The rest of the game doesn't need comments. Das
Wunder entpuppt sich als Trugbild, und die größte Ironie besteht darin, daß
der Todesstoß vom berüchtigten Turm ausgeführt wird. Der Rest bedarf keines
Kommentars.} 28. gxf4 Qg6+ 29. Kh1 Qb1+ 30. Kg2 Rd2+ 31. Re2 Qxa2 32. Rxd2
Qxd2+ 33. Kg3 a3 34. e6 Qe1+ 35. Kg4 Qxe6+ 36. f5 Qc4+ 37. Nd4 a2 38. Qd1 Nd5
39. Qa4 Nxc3 40. Qe8+ Kh7 41. Kh5 a1=Q {and Tarrasch resigned - under normal
circumstance he should have admitted defeat many moves before. After this
fateful game the score was 3:1 in favour of Lasker, and the disaster had so
shaken the confidence of the challenger that he never recovered and went on to
lose the match +3, =5, -8. und Tarrasch gab auf, was er unter normalen
Umständen vor vielen Zügen getan hätte. Nach dieser schicksalhaften Partie
stand es im Wettkampf 3:1 für Lasker. Das Debakel hatte das Selbstvertrauen
des Herausforderers derart erschüttert, daß er sich nicht mehr erholte und das
Match mit +3, =5, –8 verlor.} 0-1