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Commonwealth Chess Round 6: Vaibhav Suri is the sole leader

by Jitendra Choudhary - 08 July 2017

20-year-old Vaibhav Suri beat Aravindh Chithambaram to clinch the sole lead at the Commonwealth Championships 2017 going on in Delhi. Vaibhav began the game with peaceful intention with the exchange French, but Aravindh was in an ambitious mood and played really well to get a winning position. He blundered and let the win slip. Vaibhav is followed by a pack of four players on 5.0/6. With last three rounds to go, this is going to be an exciting finish. Report from Leela Ambience in Delhi.

 

Vaibhav Suri is playing competitive chess after quite some time. However, he is showing no signs of rustiness as he beat the second seeded Aravindh Chithambaram from the white side of an exchange French.

GM Vaibhav Suri beat Aravindh Chithambaram and has shot into the sole lead
The scoreline reads 1-0 in the favour of Vaibhav. But right from the opening it was Aravindh who was pushing and had a close to winning position. The boy from Chennai had sacrificed a piece correctly and was very close to mating the white king. But it was not to be. Two inaccurate moves were enough for Vaibhav to steady his ship, get his king to safety and make his extra piece count.
Vaibhav Suri has excellent chances of becoming the Commonwealth Champion
[Event "Commonwealth Chess-ch 2017"]
[Site "Delhi"]
[Date "2017.07.07"]
[Round "6"]
[White "Vaibhav, Suri"]
[Black "Aravindh, Chithambaram VR"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C01"]
[WhiteElo "2558"]
[BlackElo "2593"]
[PlyCount "159"]
[EventDate "2017.??.??"]

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. exd5 exd5 {When a player goes for the exchange variation
in the French, you can assume that he has peaceful intentions. However when
Aravindh is your opponent, you don't usually get a peaceful game!} 4. Nf3 Nf6
5. Bd3 Bd6 6. O-O O-O 7. Re1 Bg4 8. Nbd2 Nbd7 9. c3 c6 10. Nf1 Qc7 11. Ng3 Rae8
{Black has developed all his pieces. The opening has gone Aravindh's way. It
is quite possible that he got ambitious at this point.} 12. Bd2 Ne4 $1 13. Nxe4
dxe4 14. Rxe4 Bxh2+ 15. Kf1 Rxe4 (15... Nf6 16. Rxe8 Rxe8 $17) 16. Bxe4 Bf4 (
16... Nf6 $1 $15) 17. Qc1 Bxd2 18. Nxd2 f5 19. Bd3 Qh2 20. f3 Nf6 $1 {A strong
move. The bishop is untouchable.} 21. Kf2 (21. fxg4 Nxg4 22. Nf3 Qh1+ 23. Ng1
Qh4 24. Nh3 Qg3 25. Qd2 Re8 26. Ng5 Ne3+ 27. Kg1 Qxg5 $19) 21... Bxf3 $1 22.
Nxf3 Ng4+ 23. Kf1 Qh1+ 24. Ng1 f4 {This still keeps the advantage, But Black
had a stronger move at his disposal.} (24... Qh4 $1 25. Nh3 Qg3 $19 {And with
Re8 coming up, Black is winning. But it is not so easy to assess it during the
game.}) 25. Be4 Qh4 $6 (25... Re8 $1 26. Bf3 Ne3+ 27. Ke2 g5 $17) 26. Qe1 $1
Ne3+ 27. Ke2 {Miraculously White's king has escaped.} Qe7 28. Qb1 Nf5 (28...
Nxg2 29. Nf3 $16) 29. Kd2 c5 30. Nf3 cxd4 31. Bxf5 dxc3+ 32. bxc3 Qe3+ 33. Kc2
Rxf5 34. Qb3+ Kh8 35. Re1 Qf2+ 36. Kc1 Rf8 37. Qc2 Qc5 38. Re5 Qb6 39. Qb3 Qg6
40. Qc2 Qb6 41. Qe2 Qc6 42. Kb2 Rc8 43. Qd3 h6 44. Qd4 {White now has full
co-ordination and Black is just lost.} Qg6 45. Re2 Rc6 46. Qe4 Rb6+ 47. Kc2 Qf6
48. Qe8+ Kh7 49. Nd4 Ra6 50. Kd3 Ra5 51. Qe4+ Kh8 52. Qe8+ Kh7 53. Qe6 Qg5 54.
Qe4+ Kh8 55. Qe8+ Kh7 56. Qe4+ Kh8 57. Qxb7 Qg6+ 58. Qe4 Qa6+ 59. c4 Qd6 60.
Kc3 Rg5 61. Kb2 a5 62. Qe8+ Kh7 63. Qe4+ Kh8 64. a3 a4 65. Qe8+ Kh7 66. Qe4+
Kh8 67. Nb5 Qf6+ 68. Ka2 Rg3 69. Qa8+ Kh7 70. Qxa4 h5 71. Qc2+ Kh6 72. Rd2 g6
73. Qb2 Qe6 74. Qd4 Rg4 75. Nd6 Qe7 76. Qh8+ Kg5 77. Rd5+ Kh4 78. Rxh5+ Kg3 79.
Qc3+ Kxg2 80. Re5 {A pretty grim result for Aravindh considering that he was
so very close to winning the game.} 1-0

Abhijeet Gupta looking in great mood before the round
Abhijeet was pressing throughout the game against Swapnil Dhopade, but in the end had to settle for a draw
Aleksandar Wohl of Australia is playing some great chess and is on 5.0/6
On Facebook Alex wrote, "The championship is heating up and despite being retired since 2011 I am still managing to play on the top boards. Maybe this is my Indian summer?"
You can read about his experiences at the tournament from his blogposts that he writes every day.
Tejas Bakre split the point with Abhijit Kunte
Experienced GM Pravin Thipsay roared back after his second round loss to score four consecutive wins and is now on 4.5/6. He beat GM Sahaj Grover in the sixth round.
Thejkumar has made a positive move towards the 2500 mark by beating GM Niaz Murshed
Swati Ghate drew her game against Ziaur Rahman. With 4.5/6, she is leading in the women's section
What does the AICF Secretary do when he wants to take a break from all the official work? Of course, play chess!
After 3.5/4 start, Priyanka lost both her rounds. She is still in with a chance to achieve a WGM norm.
A true chess lover is Anila Shah (left) from Gujarat 
Famous journalist Rakesh Rao playing in the journalists tournament!
The playing hall

Results of Round 6:

Bo. No.   Name Rtg Pts. Result Pts.   Name Rtg No.
1 1 GM Gupta Abhijeet 2625 ½ - ½ GM Swapnil S. Dhopade 2517 5
2 3 GM Vaibhav Suri 2558 1 - 0 GM Aravindh Chithambaram Vr. 2593 2
3 15 GM Bakre Tejas 2449 ½ - ½ 4 GM Kunte Abhijit 2504 6
4 27 FM Mitrabha Guha 2301 4 ½ - ½ 4 GM Gagare Shardul 2472 12
5 33 WGM Kulkarni Bhakti 2255 4 0 - 1 4 IM Wohl Aleksandar H. 2355 23
6 4 GM Rahman Ziaur 2527 ½ - ½ 4 WGM Swati Ghate 2278 31
7 18 GM Murshed Niaz 2399 0 - 1 IM Thejkumar M. S. 2491 7
8 8 GM Grover Sahaj 2484 0 - 1 GM Thipsay Praveen M 2419 16
9 9 GM Deepan Chakkravarthy J. 2482 1 - 0   Priyanka K 2081 53
10 25 WGM Gomes Mary Ann 2331 ½ - ½ GM Mollah Abdullah Al Rakib 2480 10

Complete results

Rank after Round 6:

Rk. SNo   Name FED Rtg Pts.  TB1   TB2   TB3 
1 3 GM Vaibhav Suri IND 2558 5,5 0,0 22,5 25,5
2 5 GM Swapnil S. Dhopade IND 2517 5,0 0,0 21,5 23,0
3 1 GM Gupta Abhijeet IND 2625 5,0 0,0 20,5 23,0
4 23 IM Wohl Aleksandar H. AUS 2355 5,0 0,0 20,0 22,0
5 15 GM Bakre Tejas IND 2449 5,0 0,0 18,5 21,5
6 31 WGM Swati Ghate IND 2278 4,5 0,0 21,0 24,0
7 2 GM Aravindh Chithambaram Vr. IND 2593 4,5 0,0 21,0 23,5
8 6 GM Kunte Abhijit IND 2504 4,5 0,0 19,5 21,0
9 9 GM Deepan Chakkravarthy J. IND 2482 4,5 0,0 18,5 21,5
10 12 GM Gagare Shardul IND 2472 4,5 0,0 18,0 21,0

Complete Rankings

Round 7 on 2017/07/08 at 15.00 Hrs

Bo. No.   Name Rtg Pts. Result Pts.   Name Rtg No.
1 1 GM Gupta Abhijeet 2625 5   GM Vaibhav Suri 2558 3
2 5 GM Swapnil S. Dhopade 2517 5   5 GM Bakre Tejas 2449 15
3 2 GM Aravindh Chithambaram Vr. 2593   5 IM Wohl Aleksandar H. 2355 23
4 6 GM Kunte Abhijit 2504   IM Shyaamnikhil P 2450 14
5 7 IM Thejkumar M. S. 2491   FM Mitrabha Guha 2301 27
6 16 GM Thipsay Praveen M 2419   GM Deepan Chakkravarthy J. 2482 9
7 12 GM Gagare Shardul 2472   WGM Swati Ghate 2278 31
8 34 CM Thilakarathne G M H 2231 4   4 GM Rahman Ziaur 2527 4
9 10 GM Mollah Abdullah Al Rakib 2480 4   4 WGM Kulkarni Bhakti 2255 33
10 11 GM Ankit R. Rajpara 2474 4   4   Nayak Rajesh 2198 39

Complete pairings

Chess-results link of age categories:

U-8 Open (Priansh Das leads with 4.0/4)

U-8 Girls 

 

U-10 Open

U-10 Girls (It is going to be a race between Savitha and Sahithi)

 

U-12 Open

U-12 Girls (Divya Deshmukh is a clear favourite and is leading)

 

U-14 Open

U-14 Girls

 

U-16 Open

U-16 Girls

 

U-18 Open

U-18 Girls

 

U-20 Open (GM Shardul Gagare is the favourite)

U-20 Girls

Live games:

Following live games of the Commonwealth has been made very easy. You can now do it from the ChessBase India website by clicking on the link below. The games begin at 15.00 hours (except for double rounds on 6th of July). Apart from just watching the live games, you can also view the games of the previous rounds (and download them if you are a ChessBase Account Premium Member). There's also some light analysis of the games done by using the Tactical analysis feature.

 

Follow the games live by clicking on this link

Articles on Commonwealth 2017 on ChessBase India:

Commonwealth Chess Championships 2017 begin today

Live Games from Commonwealth 2017

Round one: Kumar Gaurav stuns GM Ziaur Rahman

Round two: A full blooded King's Indian fight

Round three: Women power prevails

Round four+five: Five leaders after five rounds

 

About the author:
Jitendra Choudhary is a chess trainer in Delhi. He is from Madhya Pradesh, but shifted to Delhi to pursue his passion related to chess. He currently teaches students, works as an arbiter and would like to dedicate more time to being a chess journalist.

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